September 2, 2015

Looking for Bitumen Tanker Vessels.. Grab One Here

NewLead Holdings Ltd. (OTC: NEWL) ("NewLead" or the "Company") announced today a review of the commercial performance of one of its bitumen tanker vessels, the MT Nepheli ("Nepheli") since the vessel was delivered to NewLead's fleet.
The Nepheli is a 2009-built bitumen tanker vessel of 3,416 dwt and is one of the five bitumen tanker vessels that were delivered to NewLead's fleet in the fourth quarter of 2014.
When NewLead took delivery of the Nepheli in November 2014, the vessel was already chartered-out on a time charter agreement for one year at a net rate of US $6,700 per day. The time charter contract was concluded at the end of July 2015 and from delivery of the vessel to NewLead until such time, 82,473.76 tons of asphalt were transported. Following the conclusion in July 2015, NewLead entered into a new time charter contract, in direct continuation of the prior contract, for a one year period at a gross rate of US $7,400per day less 3.75% commission payable to third parties. The Nepheli will be principally trading in the Middle East area.
Upon delivery of the Nepheli to NewLead in November 2014, the Company invested in the maintenance, improvement and upgrade of the vessel's condition. The vessel's improved technical condition allowed for an increase of approximately 5% in the vessel's cargo in-take capacity and a decrease in the fuel consumption for steaming and cargo heating, as well as an improvement of the speed and consumption of the vessel.
Mr. Michael Zolotas, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of NewLead, stated, "NewLead's investment in the improvement of the condition of the Nepheli enhanced the commercial performance and tradability of the vessel. Together with the oil major vettings, the Nepheli has been attracting reputable charterers' attention. Our decision to invest in the technical improvement of the vessel upon her delivery to NewLead is expected to enhance the cash flow of NewLead."
Mr. Zolotas added, "The enhanced performance of the Nepheli in the time charter contract upon the delivery of the vessel to NewLead resulted in the renewal of the charter party agreement with improved terms. We will continue to capitalize on the commercial and technical expertise of NewLead which are fundamental in the bitumen market while aiming to expand the Company's fleet with modern bitumen vessels. "
NewLead has approximately 50% and 74.75% of its operating days covered for 2015 and 20% and 16.27% of its operating days covered for 2016 for its dry bulk and tanker vessels, respectively.
Fleet UpdateThe following table details NewLead's fleet as of August 31, 2015:
Vessel Name
Size (dwts)
Vessel Type
Year Built
Charter Expiration Date
Dry Bulk Carriers

Newlead Castellano
35,542
Eco-type Handysize
2013
Q4 2015
Newlead Albion
32,318
Eco-type Handysize
2012
Q3 2015
Newlead Venetico
32,394
Eco-type Handysize
2012
Q3 2015
Newlead Victoria
75,966
Panamax
2002
min Q2 - max Q3 2018
Newlead Markela
71,733
Panamax
1990
Q2 2016
Tanker Vessels

  Newlead Granadino
5,887
2009
min Q1 2016 - max Q3 2017
  Katerina L
3,357
2009
Q4 2015
  Nepheli
3,416
2009
Q3 2016
  Ioli
3,396
2009
min Q1 2016 - max Q1 2020
  Sofia
2,888
2008
Spot
  Gema1
19,831
Oil Tanker
2001
Spot
1. Third party vessel under management   
About NewLead Holdings Ltd.
NewLead Holdings Ltd. is an international vertically integrated shipping, logistics and commodity company providing ideal solutions for seaborne transportation of dry bulk commodities and petroleum products through owned and managed vessels. NewLead controls a fleet of ten vessels, including five dry bulk and five tanker vessels and manages one third party tanker vessel. NewLead is a Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") reporting Foreign Private Issuer in compliance with applicable SEC rules and regulations and current in its SEC reporting, utilizing U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles' financial reporting standards. NewLead's common shares are traded under the symbol "NEWL" on the Over-the-Counter market.
Source - PR Newswire

September 1, 2015

Recycled Toners Put to Good and Final Use - Guess What .. Replacing Bitumen

Asphalt is Getting New Life from Recycled Printer Ink

Did you know that the ink in your printer is considered one of the most expensive liquids in the world? If you were to fill up your standard 15 gallon gas tank with printer ink, it would cost you almost $75,000. Ouch.
Once your printer runs out of ink, consumers (hopefully) recycle the cartridges, which leaves millions of them forgotten in landfills. Inside those cartridges, it’s estimated that there is still 13% of unused ink just sitting there goring to waste.
Enter the asphalt industry, king of recycling, to make good use of those old cartridges. This time, it's an Australian company, Downer Group, who has been working to re-purpose this leftover toner powder for use in asphalt mixes.

How it Works

The material inside your toner cartridges is actually a small plastic powder material that is melted down when printed on to paper. When the waste toner is recycled, its low melting point makes it an effective glue in asphalt. This can reduce the use of oil-based bitumen.
TonerPave is the result and it's made by adding MTP (Modified Toner Polymer) to standard asphalt. The toner is blended with recycled oil and is 40% more energy efficient than the manufacturing of standard bitumen, with a relative saving of 270kg of CO2 emissions per ton.
Every ton of the toner-based product used in the asphalt mix replaces 600kg of bitumen and 400kg of fine aggregates, such as sand and soil. Almost 100 toner cartridges are needed to make 1 ton of asphalt.

TonerPave Put to the Test

“We have these toner cartridges and the challenge is to do something with them,” says Peter Tamblyn, marketing manager at Close the Loop. “This is the only commercially viable waste toner solution on the planet, it’s a good thing.”
Currently, the product, called TonerPave is being extracted from cartridges in Melbourne and then transferred to Sydney where it’s being blended and placed as tests on roadways.
The City of Sydney’s construction services manager, Andrew Christie, said the product must prove as resilient as regular asphalt and have the same 30-year lifespan. “In two or three years we should have an indication if it is a good alternative to traditional asphalt. Hopefully we can start to use it across Australia,” he said.
At $150 per ton, the mix costs the same as standard asphalt, but Christie expects this to drop as the product matures. Raw materials represent a small portion of road resurfacing costs, he said, which is mainly taken up by machinery and staffing.
However, this is the first time TonerPave has been combined with warm mix asphalt, which has been in use in Sydney since 2010. Warm mix asphalt is heated at temperatures lower than regular asphalt and saves the city 24,000kg of CO2 emissions each year.
Christie says 30% of this new mix is also comprised of recycled asphalt, significantly higher than the industry requirement of at least 10%.
The measure is part of the City of Sydney’s target to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 70% by 2030. It was the first local council in Australia to be certified carbon neutral under the National Carbon Offset Standard.
All of Australia’s waste toner powder could theoretically one day be used in asphalt mix, Tamblyn said, but many people throw their toner out rather than recycle it.
“If we could get our hands on all of Australia’s waste toner we would happily use it,” he said.
Tamblyn says “the rest of the world is looking at this” as the company begins investigating importing toner waste from overseas markets.

August 31, 2015

Bitumen Emulsion Leaking Again

BY EDMONTON SUN
FIRST POSTED: | UPDATED: 
oil spill
Crews work to clean an oil spill near Nexen's Long Lake facility by Fort McMurray. The spill was discovered by a contractor after the safety system designed to detect ruptures failed. Garrett Barry/Fort McMurray Today/Postmedia Network
The Alberta Energy Regulator (AER) has issued a suspension order on 95 Nexen Energy pipelines in northern Alberta.
The AER said Friday that the suspension order was issued due to “noncompliant activities at Long Lake oilsands operations pertaining to pipeline maintenance and monitoring.”
The order immediately suspends 15 pipeline licences, which encompasses 95 pipelines that are carrying natural gas, crude oil, salt water, fresh water, and emulsion. Before the pipelines can be restarted, Nexen must provide “sufficient documentation” to assure the AER that these lines can be operated safely.
“Protection of public safety and the environment are the AER’s top priority,” said AER president and CEO Jim Ellis, in a press release. “Given that this company has already had a pipeline failure at this site, the AER will not lift this suspension until Nexen can demonstrate that they can be operated safely and within all regulatory requirements. We will accept no less than concrete evidence.”
In July, AER issued an environmental protection order to Nexen Energy over the leak of five million litres of oil emulsion, which is a mix of bitumen, water and sand, from a line at the Long Lake oilsands facility. The spill was discovered on July 15, when a contractor stumbled across the ruptured pipeline.
The affected area from the spill tipped in at about 16,000 square metres, mostly along the pipeline’s route.
The AER is continuing to investigate the spill. Once complete, the AER will publish its findings.
Trevor.robb@sunmedia.ca

Why two Googlers left the company's top-secret lab to create an app that aims to change how people talk to each other - Business Insider

Why two Googlers left the company's top-secret lab to create an app that aims to change how people talk to each other - Business Insider

August 29, 2015

Bitumen or the Environment ?


Aboriginal groups fear the consequences if bitumen from the Alberta oilsands were to spill into the sensitive ecosystem of Great Bear Rainforest. Part of the 2015 Atkinson Series on public policy.

A humpback whale breaches the surface near Hartley Bay along the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia. First Nations in the region are vehemently opposed to the Northern Gateway pipeline.
JONATHAN HAYWARD / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILE PHOTO
A humpback whale breaches the surface near Hartley Bay along the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia. First Nations in the region are vehemently opposed to the Northern Gateway pipeline.
Art Sterritt is the executive director of Coastal First Nations, an alliance of aboriginal groups in British Columbia. Though living about 1,200 kilometres west of the oilsands, Sterritt and other native leaders in the area have developed a keen interest in the production of thick black bitumen.
That’s because oilsands developers and Enbridge are proposing the $8-billion Northern Gateway pipeline be built between northern Alberta and the B.C. coast. It would move 525,000 barrels a day of diluted bitumen to Kitimat. There, it would be loaded onto tankers that would have to navigate chains of islands and narrow channels before reaching open sea en route to Asia.
The coastal First Nations in the area, known as the Great Bear Rainforest, make up the majority of the population, and they don’t want the pipeline. They particularly don’t want tankers full of diluted bitumen — which is much thicker than crude oil — in waters where salmon abound in a complex ecosystem that has supported their people for centuries.
“We are never going to allow pipelines as long as (the oil) can’t be cleaned up,” Sterritt told an audience in Calgary in June. “We know what happened just to the north of us with the Exxon Valdez.”
Haisla First Nation hereditary chiefs attend hearings on the proposed $8-billion Northern Gateway pipeline in B.C. in 2012. The pipeline was eventually approved, with 209 conditions.
DARRYL DYCK/THE CANADIAN PRESS
Haisla First Nation hereditary chiefs attend hearings on the proposed $8-billion Northern Gateway pipeline in B.C. in 2012. The pipeline was eventually approved, with 209 conditions.
In March 1989, the Exxon Valdez supertanker struck Bligh Reef and spilled 11 million gallons of crude oil into Alaska’s Prince William Sound. It was the worst American spill up to that point, damaging more than 2,000 kilometres of shoreline and killing hundreds of thousands of birds and marine animals and untold numbers of fish.
The Northern Gateway pipeline was the subject of extensive public hearings by the National Energy Board in 2012 and 2013, during which Sterritt’s group and others registered their fears. In the end, the National Energy Board approved it with 209 conditions that must be met before it proceeds. The Harper government seconded the motion when it gave its approval a few months later.
But many doubt the pipeline will ever be built because it is the subject of 18 court cases. Enbridge has confirmed that it won’t be in service by 2018, as previously predicted.
That’s fine with Sterritt, who asserts that it is incumbent on the oil companies to figure out how to clean up a spill should a tanker rupture or capsize.
“So far they haven’t done that,” he said. “There is no technology available to clean up oil spills. They just keep telling us that the chances of a spill are very low. But that’s not good enough.”
According to the final report of the Northern Gateway Joint Review Panel, there is significant disagreement among experts about whether the heavy diluted bitumen would sink to the sea bottom if a tanker ruptured, making it much more difficult to clean up than if it were floating on the surface. Enbridge says the diluted bitumen would float, but intervenors from Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans testified that their studies were inconclusive.
The joint review panel decided that a spill is “not likely to sink as a continuous layer that coats the seabed or riverbed.” But some of the conditions Enbridge must now meet deal with spill response and require further research on the likelihood that diluted bitumen would sink.
Meanwhile, bitumen is being transported by existing pipelines and trains. But as production at oilsands operations increases, there will be more pressure to build a pipeline such as the Northern Gateway.
Douglas Channel is the proposed end point of the Northern Gateway pipeline, which would carry 525,000 barrels a day of diluted bitumen from northern Alberta to the B.C. coast. Experts say more research is needed on the effects of an oil spill involving oilsands products.
DARRYL DYCK/THE CANADIAN PRESS
Douglas Channel is the proposed end point of the Northern Gateway pipeline, which would carry 525,000 barrels a day of diluted bitumen from northern Alberta to the B.C. coast. Experts say more research is needed on the effects of an oil spill involving oilsands products.
Source & Copytight -THE STAR