April 26, 2018

Billion $ Motorway


Ralph Riegel

THE €1 billion M20 Cork-Limerick motorway moved a step closer with the Government formally seeking tenders for the design of the critical route.
The motorway development will rank as the biggest roads project and one of the biggest infrastructural investments undertaken by Ireland to 2028.
Senator Kieran O'Donnell confirmed that the tender for the design of the 105km motorway route has now formally gone to tender.
The €8m contract will see design engineers contracted to complete the route outline and bring the mammoth project to An Bord Pleanala.
At that point, contractors for the construction of the motorway will be appointed.
"This is a very good news story - the M20 is back on track," Sen O'Donnell said.
"This involves a formal tender process for €8m to design the motorway and take it as far as the An Bord Pleanala stage."
"The M20 is required for a number of reasons - there have been a number of accidents along the N20 so it is clearly needed from a safety point of view."
Sen O'Donnell said the M20 was also vital given efforts by Cork and Limerick to attract major international events such as the Ryder Cup bid by Adare Manor in Limerick.
Last year the Government were accused of treating Limerick and Cork residents like "fools" after allocating just €1m for the key motorway development - which equates to the construction cost of just 125 metres of the 105km route.
Cork and Limerick Co Councils had expressed concerns that, at the current
rate of project funding, the motorway linking the two cities may be stalled far beyond the 2023 target.
Councillors in both Cork and Limerick had reacted angrily to the continuing failure to provide major funding for the project - with Councillor Frank O'Flynn warning that delays could threaten the long-term economic development of Ireland's second and third cities.
"This is absolutely vital - how an earth can cities like Cork and Limerick act as a counterweight to Dublin if they aren't even properly connected by road," he said.
Ireland South MEP Sean Kelly also expressed frustration at what he said, up until now, was "a lack of urgency" over one of the most strategic motorway projects
now facing the State.
Cork and Limerick business interests had also expressed alarm at proposals to save €340m on the motorway by diverting it through Tipperary along part of the existing M8 Cork-Dublin motorway.
Mr Kelly said Ireland had to demonstrate its commitment to regional development.
"We were quite happy to use European funding to build motorways connecting Dublin with the cities of Ireland," he said.
"But there seems to be no urgency in connecting the cities with one another."
"You have the second biggest city in Ireland, Cork, not being connected by motorway with the second biggest city in Munster, Limerick."
"That is actually a no-brainer - it has to happen. The sooner it happens the better."
There were growing fears that construction work on the proposed €1bn M20 motorway from Cork through Mallow, Buttevant, Charleville, Croom and Raheen to Limerick may not begin for almost a decade.
Government planners had examined the Tipperary 'short cut' option on the basis that it would also offer the double advantage of creating a key segment of the M24/N24 Limerick-Tipperary-Rosslare motorway.
While no formal proposal has yet been made, it is understood Government planners are considering alternatives to the existing M20 route through Mallow, Charleville, Croom and Raheen because of its estimated €840m to €1 billion construction cost.
A Cork-Limerick route through Mallow, Charleville and Croom is 105km long.
However, a spur from Cahir in Tipperary, off the main M8 Dublin-Cork motorway, to Limerick is just 63km.
At an average motorway construction cost of €8m per km, according to Engineers Ireland figures, that would represent a cost saving of €340m for the Government.
However, whereas the direct Cork-Limerick route is 105km, any new diverted motorway via Cahir would involve a total distance between Ireland's second and third cities of 141km.
Cork and Limerick politicians and business associations have insisted that only a Cork-Mallow-Charleville-Croom-Limerick corridor for the M20 was workable.
The Construction Industry Federation (CIF) warned that a motorway linking Ireland’s
second and third cities was vital if regional urban centres were to act as a strategic counter-weight to Dublin.
Both cities have campaigned for the motorway for the past 25 years.
Sections of the existing N20 route between Cork and Limerick have been described as amongst the most accident-prone stretches of primary roadway in Ireland.
The section between Mallow and Charleville is believed to have the highest rate of fatal accidents of any route in Ireland.
Sections of the N20 around Blarney and Waterloo have also been the focus of multiple serious accidents the latest of which occurred on Monday when a US tourist was seriously injured at exactly the same spot where two US tourists were killed last September.
IBEC economist, Fergal O’Brien, warned last year it was particularly astonishing that Ireland wasn’t availing of historically low interest rates to tackle major capital projects that would have obvious long-term economic benefits.
“The M20 is a perfect candidate for a PPP approach,” he said.
The proposed motorway aims to slash 30 minutes from the commute time between Ireland’s second and third largest cities and remove some of the most dangerous stretches of single-carriageway primary road in the country.
It was hoped the motorway would also ease congestion with major bypasses of towns like Mallow, Buttevant, Charleville and enhance access to areas like Croom and Raheen.

April 17, 2018

Project Delays

Another year of delays along Highway 401 in SDG and Cornwall

By Marc Benoit, Special to the Cornwall Standard-Freeholder
<p>Projects in the works for 2018 along Highway 401 in Cornwall and SDG. Map produced by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation.</p><p>
Handout/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder/Postmedia Network
Projects in the works for 2018 along Highway 401 in Cornwall and SDG. Map produced by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation.
Handout/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder/Postmedia Network
Drivers can expect to spend a bit more time in traffic this summer as  they navigate Highway 401 through SDG.
SDG council heard from representatives from the Ministry of Transportation on Monday, as six major construction projects along the 401 corridor are planned for 2018, alongside 20 major projects provincewide. The projects are expected to create delays and frustrations for drivers, which the Ministry of Transportation is hoping to address.
Frank Pinder and Mike Delugt presented the MTO plan for southern Ontario highways, and answered questions and concerns from staff members and councillors in relation to the detours and delays planned for the summer.
Wales Road underpass and Avonmore Road underpass near Long Sault are slated for construction work, along with the Pitt Street overpass, the Bainsville Road underpass, the South Raisin River culvert, and paving along the stretch between Lancaster and Cornwall. Of these, the Avonmore Road work is a carryover from the 2017 season. It was initially supposed to be complete last year.
Each project will require a 12-hour closure in each direction, leading to an increased volume of traffic on local roads.
SDG staff members and councillors expressed concern over the impact the closures may have on the community. It will also be another summer — the third or fourth — that there is Highway 401 construction taking place within SDG and Cornwall.
Couns. Jim Bancroft and Tammy Hart pressed the delegation from the MTO about the Avonmore project, as it had been originally slated for completion last year. Due to issues with the tender, the project has carried over to the current season.
“Avonmore Road is still closed and that’s a big concern,” said Ben de Haan, director of planning for SDG. “That’s meant disruption for the residents. It impacts how we plow the roads, patrol, and maintain them. So there is quite a bit of impact, even if it’s a little each day.”
The company tasked with completion of the project, Cruickshank Construction, is the same company in charge of completing the Wales Road project. de Haan noted there is concern at the municipal level the company will not be able to complete the project on time, leading to a similar situation as Avonmore.
“We want assurances that the road will be open before winter,” said de Haan.
To better prepare motorists for the summer of detours and delays, the MTO is promoting its Twitter feed as a way to stay informed, along with the Ontario 511 website, alongside digital signage posted along the Highway 401.
“Drivers will have the information they need to plan ahead,” said Delugt.
As part of the Southern Highways Program rolled out by the provincial government, the MTO had to scale back the number of projects across the province for the current season.

April 12, 2018

India's Road Building Spree

The Financial Year 2017-18 yielded projects worth over Rs 1,220 billion. The National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) awarded 150 such projects, the highest number in the latter half of last decade. In last 5 years, the average length of road projects awarded by NHAI was 2,860 km compared to 7,400 km in FY 17-18. This is a record accomplishment by National Highways Authority of India since its inception back in 1995. 

From the 150 projects awarded in FY 17-18, a stretch of 3,791 km was awarded on EPC mode at a figure of Rs 430 billion and 3,396 km was awarded on Hybrid Annuity mode at a cost of Rs 765 billion and the remaining 209 km on Toll mode at a cost of Rs 25 billion. According to the official statement, tendering and awarding of projects accelerated only after approval of the Bharatmala Pariyojana and establishment of a new procedure for sanction put in place in November 2017. 

Bharatmala Pariyojana is a centrally-funded roads and highways project of the Government of India. The project covers a network which is 83,677 km wide with the estimated investment in excess of Rs 5.35 lakh crore. The project will build highways connecting Gujarat, Rajasthan, and Punjab, and then the entire string of the Himalayan States namely Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand. Some border areas of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar are also part of this grand road networking plan. Connecting far-flung border and rural areas is the main agenda behind the initiation of this project. 
Bharatmala will also raise the number of corridors to 50 (from current 6). 

In the run, post-Bharatmala, 232 projects were put on tender covering over 11,200 km of road length with costs exceeding Rs 1,960 billion. The projects granted include coverage of 1,234 km in Rajasthan, 747 km in Odisha, 739 km in Maharashtra, 725 km in Uttar Pradesh, 511 km in Tamil Nadu, 504 km in Andhra Pradesh, 468 km in Karnataka and balance in other states. It is widely expected that projects with coverage of around 3000 km will be awarded in the first two months of FY 2018-19 itself. 


For more details visit: http://www.nhai.gov.in/ 
Contact Information
  • Name: teja vala
    Company: indiainvestmentworld  Telphone: 91-40-48502943 , -Address: madhapur,hyderabad

    April 2, 2018

    Pan Borneo Highway- A Game Changer

    Singapore Bitumen Supplier
    BINTULU: After waiting for nearly five decades, the dream of the people of Sabah and Sarawak of having a modern highway cutting across two of Malaysia’s largest states is finally being realised, with the Pan-Borneo Highway expected to be completed within five years.

    Spanning 1,089km from Telok Melano and Sematan to Lawas, the mega project was initiated by the Barisan Nasional government under Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak, with an allocation of RM14.2 billion for the Sarawak portion alone.

    The first phase of the project — Pan-Borneo Highway Sarawak — was officially launched by the prime minister in Bintulu on March 31, 2015. Construction along a 43km-stretch from Nyabau to the Bakun junction began soon after.

    The largest infrastructure development project in the state was announced by Najib as part of the ruling coalition’s manifesto in the 13th General Election (GE13).

    It made history as the first highway project, with a four-lane dual carriageway of JKR R5 standard, to be built toll-free.

    The highway is expected to spur local development and enhance the people’s socio-economic status, including through the creation of many new towns along the highways and boosting the tourism sector.

    “It (highway) will bring a lot of changes to Sarawak, not just in the context of development, but also by boosting the socio-economic level of its people,” said Najib.

    His confidence is based on the success of the North-South Expressway (PLUS) project, which had brought numerous developmental impacts from Johor all the way to Perlis.

    Najib, who is also BN chairman, said the project was seen as an “agent of change” which would be capable of bringing changes to the development of the state, especially in the rural areas and contribute positively to the socio-economy of the people, such as creating jobs and business opportunities.

    In terms of implementation, he said, it benefited the local contractors through the Project-Deliver Partnerships (PDP) method, in particular Sarawak’s Bumiputera companies.

    The mega project is seen as part of efforts to bridge the development gap between the Peninsula and Sabah and Sarawak, and as such, is being closely monitored to ensure it will be completed on schedule to avoid the people in both states being left waiting.

    A check by the New Straits Times Press (NSTP) showed that the construction work on the first phase, involving the Nyabau to Simpang junctions, was proceeding smoothly.

    A resident, Kizie Matusup, 36, said the construction of the highway was a blessing as it would make it easier for people to travel from the north to the south of the state, which was currently a half day’s journey.

    “We need about 12 to 13 hours to travel from Kuching to Miri. It takes us longer during peak seasons, which is exhausting.

    “Sometimes, we need to make a stop overnight in Sibu before continuing our journey, which increases our travel expenses.

    “Once the highway is completed, we expect the travel time to be reduced by at least half,” he said.

    The construction of the highway, which began three years ago, has already started contributing to economic growth, particularly the local food and beverage business as well as shops selling daily necessities and other local products.

    In Sarawak, the 11 work packages under the first phase of the highway are being implemented accordingly, with the majority involving the upgrading of the federal road from two to four lanes, except the Melano-Sematan route.

    The 32.7km-long road was a new route constructed upon the request of the late chief minister Tan Sri Adenan Satem, consisting of bridges and other facilities such as rest and recreation stops.

    As for Sabah, it involves 35 work packages worth RM12.8 billion, which begins from Sindumin, Sipitang to Tawau with seven packages implemented between April 2016 and December last year.

    Borneo Highway PDP (BHP) Sdn Bhd managing director Shahelmey Yahya said the handover of the remaining project package to the contractor was expected to be completed by the end of June, with 10 of them on the west coast, while another 18 packages were in the central and east coast of Sabah.

    “As of March, 10 new packages have been approved by the Finance Ministry.

    “Four more packages are pending approval of allocation, while 14 packages are in the tender process and the preliminary engineering assessment phase,” he said.

    The project also involves the construction of three new routes, namely, Putatan-Inanam known as Kota Kinabalu Outer Ring Road (KKOR), the Tuaran-Kudat Coastal Road and the Lahad Datu Bypass.

    Shahelmey said based on current developments, the supply of construction materials was sufficient, thus, he was confident that the project could be completed on schedule.

    He gave his assurance that the implementation of the project was proceeding smoothly after the tender process and the packages had been handed over to the appointed contractors.

    “If there are any problems, it may have been due to weather conditions and land acquisition processes that delayed the work, but we have reminded all contractors to resolve the minor issues immediately to ensure that the project can be completed on schedule,” he said.

    - NST

    No Money No Honey - Road Projects

    Contractors abandon Sh1.7bn road projects for non-payment



    Construction of Outer Ring Road /MONICAH MWANGI
    Construction of Outer Ring Road /MONICAH MWANGI
    Road contractors have abandoned more than 60 projects since 2013 due to nonpayment by the county. The projects are worth Sh1.7 billion.
    For years residents have been complaining about the high number of stalled projects and poor services by the county government.
    The contractors who quit will lose out because the county will not pay them even for the little work they had done before they withdrew their services. City Hall has already re-advertised the projects.
    Acting Transport chief officer Fredrick Karanja says many more infrastructure projects worth billions of shillings have stalled. But contractors have agreed to carry on with the work after the new administration committed to pay them.
    “We have been engaging them and we will pay those who have agreed to come back. We have so far paid out Sh300 million,” Karanja said.
    This comes as it emerged that at least four people are killed each day on the newly constructed Outer Ring Road in Eastlands.
    Abandoned projects include John Osogo and Muigai Kenyatta roads in Dandora. The two, which lead to Dandora dumpsite, were allocated Sh210 million in the 2016-17 financial year. Others include Ole Sagane Road in Madaraka, which was being rehabilitated, construction of a non-motorised transport route in Kibera and rehabilitation of California Road in Eastleigh.
    tenders paid
    Transport executive Mohammed Dagane said non-payment of contractors is the sector’s main problem. In the current financial year, the executive said, Sh1.2 billion of Sh4.9 billion tenders awarded have been paid.
    The two spoke during a breakfast meeting with journalists at the Sarova Stanley Hotel. All the CECs attended the forum.
    Dagane also blamed the poor state of roads in the county on inadequate technical personnel, lack of county-owned basic construction equipment, under-investment in public transport and massive encroachment on road reserves.
    Meanwhile, the county government has written to the Kenya Urban Roads Authority to construct footbridges and other safety structures to reduce the numbers accidents on the road.
    “We have asked them to introduce safe crossing ways like tunnels and underpasses. But another problem is the habit of Kenyan drivers who always want to test their vehicles whenever a new road is built,” Karanja said.