Showing posts with label Benzene International Pte Ltd. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Benzene International Pte Ltd. Show all posts

December 14, 2018

NHAI repeals tender

Elevtated Road project has been cancelled
By UdaipurTimes Team on December 14, 2018


National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) has repealed the tender that was floated for the elevatted road in Udaipur – from Court Chauraha to Udaipol.

In 2016, the Rs 136 Crore project was approved by the State Government and NHAI was asked to execute the project  by means of its regular tendering process, and NHAI had processed the tender.

However, a public interest litigation , followed by appointment of consultants by the NHAI to look into the project feasibility even after the State Government had given approval, subsequent intervention by the court recently and finally questioning on the feasibility reports by the CRRI to NHAI, resulted in the NHAI cancelling the tender and the project.  There will no longer be an elevated road in the congested areas of the city.

Hearing the Public Interest Litigation (PIL), Rajasthan High Court had put an interim stop on proposed elevated road in Udaipur. The High Court has issued a notice to National Highway Authority of India, Collector of Udaipur and others in this regard.


Two member bench of Chief Justice, Rajasthan High Court, Pradeep Nandrjog along with Justice Vineet Mathur head the PIL and issued a notice to NHAI, PWD, Udaipur Collector and others seeking a response till 30-July 2018.

The High Court had directed the CRRI to review the project and CRRI had asked NHAI to submit the report, following which NHAI cancelled the entire project and the tender that was issued.

This was the proposed project and the problems accompanying it:

Elevated road planned to be constructed from Udiapol to Court Chauraha (Elevated Road length: 1.65 km; Cost: Rs 126-130 Crore)
Project to have been executed in time and completed by 2021
On completion, the traffic situation in the heart of Udaipur would have eased considerably.  Vehicles needing to move from near Hiran Magri/Udiapol would go use the elevated road.  Only vehicles needing to come into the Delhi gate Surajpol, and such internal areas will need to use the existing roads.  This would ease traffic considerably.

DPR of the consulting agencies for the elevated road raised plenty of technical faults with the plan and said that the project was unfeasible.
A report submitted by the NHAI also confirmed that the project was unfeasible.
Project feasibility mentioned that road was not as per Road Congress standards…viz.

Buses, trucks and HTVs will not be allowed to use the elevated road.
Udiapole road is around 90 feet now; out of this 50 feet will be taken in for constructing the fly-over. A service road will be made underneath which will be used by buses and HTVs. The service road will be of 41 feet in this case. Because of this only 20 feet road on each side will be free which is very likely to create traffic jams.

Speed limit for vehicles has been determined at 40 km/hr whereas as per IRC it should be at least 60 km/hr. Hence speed limit is not as per standard rules.
There is no provision of footpath on the elevated road. Any pedestrian on this road is sure to face risk while on the road.

The Public Interest Litigation was filed by Om Prakash Khatri, JS Dave and Udaipur Citizen Society and others. Representing the applicants, Senior advocate M S Singhvi, Sanjay Mathur and Akhilesh Rajpurohit said that regulations and provisions related to road crossing have been overlooked in the proposed flyover at Udiapole and the elevated road. They also alleged that the design of the proposed flyover has technical faults and raises severe issues related to public security.

Finally, the High Court has also, in its order said that the elevated road project, if it ever comes up in future, will take into cognizance the current decision by High Court and NHAI and will seek approval from the High Court before proceeding.

Source- Udaipur Times

December 6, 2018

Swedish Accident Spot to be covered

NCC to sort out 6km Swedish accident blackspot

 1 day NCC is to rebuild a dangerous road in Sweden under a contract worth nearly SEK455m (£40m).

It has signed a comprehensive agreement with the Swedish Transport Administration to build a new road along a 6km stretch of European route E14 between Timmervägen and Blåberget outside Sundsvall. NCC’s assignment includes construction of a new four-lane expressway, intersections and five bridges as well as the reconstruction of the current route.
The existing road is a blackspot for accidents, and the purpose of the project is to improve accessibility and traffic safety for both motorists and unprotected road users along the route.
The construction project will be planned to ensure a safe work environment while minimising disruptions to motorists, through initiatives including construction of temporary bypasses.
Construction work will start in early 2019 and is expected to be completed by the end of 2021.

December 3, 2018

Railway Bridge Replacement

Three Halifax railway bridges to be replaced


Vehicles pass over the railway bridge on a road in Halifax on Friday morning. CN is proposing to put a temporary bridge in place while the current bridge is repaired. (RYAN TAPLIN/ STAFF)
Vehicles pass over the railway bridge on a road in Halifax on Friday morning. CN is proposing to put a temporary bridge in place while the current bridge is repaired. (RYAN TAPLIN/ STAFF)
Traffic movement through a significant portion of peninsular Halifax will be affected next year when Canadian National Railway Co. begins work to replace three dilapidated railway bridges in the city’s south end.
CN fought the city over who was responsible for maintaining seven railway bridges in the south end and therefore responsible for their replacement, but the matter has been settled after a protracted legal fight with the railway given responsibility for replacing the structure and the regional municipality obligated to pay for road and utility repairs.
Halifax Water is seeking an additional $1.4 million for the Quinpool Road CN Rail utility bridge.
Previous funding of $697,000 for the road bridge’s water and wastewater infrastructure replacement was approved by the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board as part of the 2018-19 capital budget.
“At the time of budget preparations, it was assumed that the new water and wastewater piping would be installed in a similar methodology as existing conditions,” wrote Carl Yates, general manager of Halifax Water, in a funding request to the utility board on Thursday.
The current water and sewer infrastructure, installed in 1916, are in the concrete arch.
“Unfortunately, the thickness of the new concrete arch prevents the installation of new utility lines because the road base is too shallow to accommodate new mains,” said the general manager.
Hatch, an international engineering company with an office in Halifax, is CN’s bridge design consultant. It has recommended a separate utility bridge be constructed next to the existing road bridge to avoid the expense and risk of having to temporarily pump or convey wastewater around the construction site.
The consulting company’s revised cost estimate was $743,948, excluding HST, said Yates.
In order to make the scheduled start date of April 2019, the project was broken into two tenders, said Halifax Water’s general manager.
The tender for supply of the utility bridge was awarded to Algonquin Bridge for $195,438, excluding HST.
Construction of the utility bridge, which will span the rail-cut on the north side of the existing bridge, is to be carried out this winter, said Yates.
A second tender, for installation of the bridge and relocated services, closed on Nov. 15 with submissions from Atlantic Road Construction and Paving Ltd., Dexter Construction and Brycon Construction for $1.48 million, $1.484 million and $1.815 million, respectively. The tender will be awarded based on funding approval from the utility board.
Coun. Shawn Cleary, who represents the area that includes the Quinpool Road bridge, said replacing the bridges is a safety issue and is at the point “where it’s got to be done.”
“One of the first questions I had when I got elected was, ‘Why are those there, why do we need to protect pedestrians?’” recalled the district councillor about the jersey barriers around the bridge in a phone interview.
“I remember the look on our transportation directors’ faces, they said: ‘Councillor, they’re not there to protect pedestrians, they’re there to protect the bridge.’ Because if someone hits them, I mean those railings will just collapse and they’ll go down,” Cleary said.
“Thankfully, we don’t have to pay for the bridge itself,” said the councillor.
“The municipality’s capital budget has allocated $845,000 for the bridge rehabilitation on Quinpool Road,” states the HRM website.
The Quinpool Road bridge is one of three CN-owned bridges to be rehabilitated in 2019.
Belmont-on-the-Arm and Marlborough Wood arch bridges are also to undergo repairs next year, with funding from the municipality yet to be determined.
The three structures are predicted to cost the municipality $1.8 million, based on preliminary estimates provided by engineers, states the website.
CN did not respond to request for comment.

December 1, 2018

Procurement Model - Progressive or Blocking


SHINOVENE IMMANUEL and TJIPENANDJAMBI KUHANGA
THE Central Procurement Board has told the Roads Authority to re-advertise two highway road tenders worth N$1,4 billion.
However, the Roads Authority, a parastatal tasked with constructing and managing national roads, believes that the procurement process will delay the projects for more years.

The highways in question include the Windhoek to Okahandja road which would be extended by 21 kilometres for N$1 billion while the Swakopmund to Walvis Bay road will be extended by eight kilometres for N$435 million.

A person familiar with this matter said the Central Procurement Board informed the Roads Authority about its decision last month.

The Namibian understands that the tender agency initially told the roads parastatal to also re-advertise the Windhoek to Hosea Kutako International Airport tender, but that decision is still being discussed.

The decision by the Central Procurement Board comes after Roads Authority chief executive Conrad Lutombi wrote to the transport ministry on 2 February 2018, recommending that the three companies which are currently constructing the highways should be given extensions to work on the next kilometres, which would rule out advertising the tenders.

The Roads Authority has in the past warned that these projects would be delayed and it will cost the government more money if the contracts are re-advertised. The Roads Authority believes that it will be cheaper to continue with the current contractors and save up to N$251 million.

The parastatal is of the opinion that re-advertising the Windhoek to Okahandja road, scheduled for completion by next year as part of the 'Harambee road projects' goals, will delay the project.

Sources said officials at the Roads Authority believe that the Central Procurement Board does not have the powers to award these road contracts because they were awarded by the previous tender regime, which gave parastatals powers to hand out tenders.

The Namibian understands that the Central Procurement Board approached attorney general Albert Kawana earlier this year to obtain a legal opinion on whether the tender agency has powers to award or extend contracts issued by the previous procurement regime.

Kawana declined to comment yesterday while chairperson of the Central Procurement Board Patrick Swartz did not answer a question sent to him on Tuesday.

In the meantime, uncertainty faces the completion of the Windhoek to Okahandja two-way road.

The initial plan was to construct the Windhoek to Okahandja road concurrently in the final phase of the project, but the tender has been delayed for more than two years.

“There is no way we can complete the Okahandja road by next year as promised in the Harambee Prosperity Plan,” a person familiar with the project told The Namibian this week.

Roads Authority spokesperson Hileni Fillemon said the construction of the Windhoek to Okahandja section 4A road is progressing. The current phase consists of the 27km road from Döbra River to the Omakunde interchange.

“Progress on this project is at 78%. Five bridges have been fully completed, and works are progressing well on the bridges/interchanges that we are currently busy with,” she said.

The section is set to be completed by September 2019, she added.

The section 4B, which is 21km, covers the road from the Osona military base to the Otjiwarongo junction – behind Okahandja on the southern side, and it will be turned into a highway.

“The design for this section has been completed, and the Roads Authority is currently engaging the government to secure funds for this section,” Fillemon continued.

The spokesperson said phase one of the Windhoek to Hosea Kutako International Airport road, which stretches from Mandume Ndemufayo Avenue to Sam Nujoma Drive, is 60% completed.

BUDGET CUT

The finance ministry and the transport ministry have over the years clashed over the roads tender. The finance ministry bluntly blamed the transport ministry for committing the government to road contracts worth more than N$2 billion without consulting treasury. Deputy transport minister Sankwasa James Sankwasa said in a letter earlier this year that the roads contracts were riddled with corruption.

There is evidence that the finance ministry reduced the initial budget for the three highway projects.

Documents provided by the transport ministry show that the finance ministry chopped the budget for the three roads projects by N$292 million when the national budget was revised last month.

The Windhoek to Okahandja road, which had an initial budget of N$241 million, was reduced by N$90 million, leaving the project with N$151 million to construct the ongoing road project.

The Windhoek to Hosea Kutako road project was reduced by N$102 million and left with N$47 million. This road is set to be funded by the African Development Bank and a Chinese grant.

The Swakopmund to Walvis Bay two-way road, which had a N$149 million budget, was cut to N$47 million, reducing the project amount by N$102 million.

These project cuts were part of the massive cuts faced by the transport ministry last month.
The ministry's entire budget for this year was reduced by N$700 million from N$2,2 billion to N$1,5 billion.

Director in the works department at the Ministry of Works and Transport, Anneline Black told The Namibian two weeks ago that the finance ministry did not consult them when it chopped the budget of 29 out of 44 projects at the cost of N$700 million.

“The Ministry of Finance did not consult the line ministries on the budget cuts of the development budget,” Black said.The finance ministry did not respond to questions about the lack of consultations.
The ministry of works indicated that the upgrading of the railway network was also cut by N$103 million from an initial budget of N$371 million.
The transport ministry is also faced with a poor implementation record.

Black, who was acting as permanent secretary of the transport ministry, said 21 out of 44 projects were not implemented for this financial year due to the lack of money.

The ministry did not respond to questions about the projects budgeted for but not implemented.
Black, however, said the ministry is still making some progress, despite the budget cuts.

“After having looked at all the affected projects, I can in all honesty not see how these project cuts will not negatively impact these projects at all,” she added.

Source - The Namibian

November 16, 2018

Credit Union HQ Construction to begin

Construction work is poised to start on a new headquarters for one of Ireland’s largest credit unions after a breakthrough in a legal dispute which stalled the project for years.
The chief executive of Bishopstown Credit Union in Cork, which has almost 21,000 members and assets of €150m, confirmed that the dispute with Dunnes Stores over a small section of land next to the earmarked site on Curraheen Road, has been settled to everyone’s satisfaction.
Pictured, on site, after the official contract signing, were members of the Board of Directors and officials from Cumnor Construction and project team. Pic: Brian Lougheed
The settlement, which did not involve any financial payments, has cleared the way for the signing of contracts for the construction of the credit union’s new headquarters on the site of the former Viscount Bar - plans for which were first unveiled in 2013 - two years after the credit union bought the bar and demolished it.
A planning appeal to An Bórd Pleanála delayed the project by 2.5 years before the dispute with Dunnes further delayed building. The site has lain vacant and surrounded by hoarding for several years.
But Mr Kenny confirmed last night that builders will be on site within days after a €5.835m contract was awarded to Cumnor Construction following a competitive tender process.
Construction is expected to take a year to complete.
He also defended the cost and scale of the project and said it will ensure that the branch will be able to cater for growth and future development of credit union sector which has seen many mergers in recent years.
Chairman of Bishopstown Credit Union, David P Barry, welcomed the signing of the contract: “We are now re-establishing our presence in the heart of Bishopstown.
"Work will commence this month and it is intended that the building will be completed and fitted out in 12-months.
As one of the largest community-based credit unions in Ireland, with assets of €150m and a staff of 30 people, we have outgrown our current premises on the Wilton Road and our new headquarters will enable us to make further progress as a key local financial service provider.
“We are a strong and secure financial institution which has made significant investment in IT as a feature of the credit union’s success, and we now have one of the most advanced service delivery channels in the country," he added.
Founded in 1967, Bishopstown Credit Union originally operated from the crypt of Dennehy’s Cross church.
At one time, it had four branches - the headquarters it opened on Wilton Rd in 1997, the branch in Wilton Shopping Centre, as well as offices on the Curraheen Road and in Ballinhassig.
It closed the Curraheen Road and Ballinhassig branches as part of an overall cost-saving drive which achieved some €500,000 in savings.
Once the new building is ready, the credit union headquarters will relocate to Curraheen Road.
The Wilton Road premises, and the adjoining property which it also owns, will be sold - the proceeds of which will help offset the construction costs - and the Wilton Shopping Centre branch will be retained.

August 2, 2018

Infrastructure Spending - More the Delay more the Money

Picture: ISTOCK
Picture: ISTOCK
The South African National Roads Agency (Sanral), which has starved the construction sector of work for nearly a year, is finally waking up from its slumber — although analysts say it will have little room to manoeuvre for the foreseeable future.
Sanral’s rollout of contracts stalled in 2017 because of disagreements with the Treasury over processes to award consulting service tenders. That led to a major backlog of road projects and has taken its toll on the ailing construction industry.
Basil Read, which has a roads division, is one of several contractors to have succumbed to the generally anaemic state of the industry. The 66-year-old firm was forced into business rescue in June.
Sanral spokesman Vusi Mona told Business Day the roads agency "is contracting again after resolving the issue of design contracts with Treasury".
"We have now resumed the awarding of both design contracts and construction work," Mona said.
AECI CEO Mark Dytor, whose company recently bought materials supplier Much Asphalt, told Business Day last week that Sanral and other roads agencies had started appointing engineers to oversee tender evaluations.
Dytor agreed the Treasury had become more prudent in its cash disbursements and the new government was "clamping down on where the money’s going at the moment".
"But what we are seeing from the likes of Sanral is that contracts are starting to be let out, and I think that bodes well for the last quarter of the year and next year," he said.
"If the country is to grow we have to spend on infrastructure," Dytor said, adding that he expected President Cyril Ramaphosa to prioritise roads and other similar projects.
However, analysts say that while starved construction firms would pounce at tenders, they doubt whether Sanral can afford new roads.
Ample capacity
FNB senior economic analyst Jason Muscat said there was ample capacity in the industry for road projects, since large contractors, including Raubex, were largely weathering the storm.
"But government finances are really not in a position for new builds — at the moment it’s really about keeping everything bandaged up sufficiently to keep going. So I would imagine the bulk of Sanral’s spend is going to go towards maintenance rather than new infrastructure."
Muscat said the state was having to cut back on infrastructure to fund items such as free tertiary education and to provide guarantees for state-owned enterprises.
And if calls within the ANC to scrap e-tolls were taken seriously, Sanral’s woes in the debt capital markets would be compounded.
Muscat said the construction industry as a whole was in a desperate state.
The civil confidence index, which FNB compiles along with the Bureau of Economic Research, fell to 15 points in the second quarter — the fourth-lowest number in the index’s 21-year history.
The average reading over the two decades is 45 points.
The second-quarter reading shows that 85% of respondents did not have confidence in the civil construction sector, partly because competition for the few tenders in the market was becoming even fiercer, and margins were now ultra-thin at best. As many as 90% of respondents said that there was insufficient work, primarily due to the lack of state projects.
Aveng’s share price was closing in on R70 prior to the 2010 Fifa World Cup, but has plummeted to just 8c on Wednesday. Over the same period, Group Five has fallen from close to R60 to 85c and Esor from about R6 to 10c.
Those with bigger international footprints, such as WBHO, have held up better.
Muscat expects more failures in the industry, or at least some consolidation.
He cited German firm Aton’s hostile bid for Murray & Roberts, which in turn has been trying to buy out Aveng.
He said FNB was concerned that following SA’s weak growth in the first quarter and negative high-frequency data in the second quarter, the bank may have to revise its 2018 growth forecasts for the country downwards, from 1.6%.
"We’re concerned that downgrades are soon going to be in the spotlight again, and obviously that’s going to hit Sanral and Eskom bonds … and it’s going to make the cost of financing that debt almost unmanageable, so we’re really up against it at the moment."
Industry Insight economist David Metelerkamp said the release of Sanral projects would be a "good boost" for the construction industry, since road projects account for the bulk of civil construction work — as much as 55% in 2017.
"So this would be a big reprieve for some contractors — in the short run — that are absolutely dying for work."
Most contractors were operating at between 51% and 75% capacity, which meant they had "plenty of resources lying idle waiting for the next job".
However, Metelerkamp said that the country still had too many construction companies compared with other markets, so failures in the current environment were inevitable.
"And even if Sanral are to release a flurry of projects, it still won’t be a big enough reprieve for the overall sector," Metelerkamp said.

July 20, 2018

Over Priced Road Contracts


THE transport ministry rejected a plan by the Roads Authority to extend three road contracts valued at N$1,6 billion to three companies without publicly advertising the tenders.
Currently, there are three highways under construction – the Swakopmund to Walvis Bay, the Windhoek to Hosea Kutako and the Windhoek to Okahandja.

The Swakopmund to Walvis Bay highway is being constructed by Chinese-owned company Unik Construction Engineering Namibia and its Namibian partner, Thohi Construction for N$958 million.

The N$1 billion contract for the contruction of a section of the Windhoek to Okahandja highway was awarded to the Italian construction company CMC and their Namibian partner Otesa Civil Engineering, while another N$1 billion contract for the Windhoek to Hosea Kutako highway went to the China Railway Seventh Group and Onamagongwa Trading Enterprise.

Two of the highways – Windhoek to Hosea Kutako and Windhoek to Okahandja – are supposed to be completed by January 2019, while the Swakopmund to Walvis Bay highway should be done by June next year.

Works and Transport permanent secretary Willem Goeiemann asked the RA last year to present a strategy on how the parastatal plans to implement the three projects to meet deadlines.

RA chief executive Conrad Lutombi wrote to Goeie­mann on 2 February 2018, recommending that the three companies which are currently constructing the highways should be given extensions to work on the next kilometres, which would rule out advertising the tenders.

According to the Roads Authority (RA), the Windhoek to Hosea Kutako International Airport road would be extended by three kilometres at a cost of N$150 million, while the Swakopmund to Walvis Bay road will increase by eight kilometres for N$435 million. The Windhoek to Okahandja road would be extended by 21 kilometres for a whopping N$1 billion.

The RA stated that the three road extensions would cost a combined N$1,6 billion, and that allowing continuity would save the government N$147 million.

The savings, according to the parastatal, include the fact that the companies would not need to set up a new construction camp. The camp consists of workers' accommodation.

THE LOW ROAD

Works deputy minister Sankwasa James Sankwasa, however, rejected this proposal to extend the roads, and blasted the RA for accepting inflated tenders.

Sankwasa rejected the proposal in two letters he wrote to works minister John Mutorwa and Goeiemann on 27 February and 2 May 2018.

“I am not in a position to agree with the recommendations to award the extensions of construction work to the existing tenderers,” he said, suggesting that the RA should instead go for a public tender, supervised by the ministry of works.

“Should any tenderer not quote within the confines or rates of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region, the government should reject such tender,” he emphasised.

According to him, Namibian road projects, compared to other southern African countries, are expensive.

The deputy minister said he researched Namibian road construction costs compared to other countries, mainly Zambia, Botswana, Zimbabwe and South Africa.

“I discovered that nearly all SADC countries construct roads of bitumen (tar) standards at approximately N$5 million to N$8 million per kilometre, depending on the topography of the area where the road is being constructed,” he said.

The deputy minister further said that about 10 years ago, Namibia was constructing roads at an average cost below N$5 million per kilometre.

“This seems to have changed overnight, to where Namibia is constructing at the cost of N$12 to N$15 million per kilometre,” he added.

The three roads are priority projects under the Harambee Prosperity Plan, President Hage Geingob's signature development plan, which has promised better roads up to 2020.

“Does government have to undertake overpriced projects because they are Harambee projects?” the deputy minister asked.

“The sudden escalation in the costs of road construction and all other construction works in Namibia requires an urgent investigation, and the halting of such overpricing practices”, he stressed.

For instance, Sankwasa said the Swakopmund to Walvis Bay road was overpriced by around N$60 million, compared to the initial cost government budgeted for.

The deputy minister said he objected to the awarding of the Swakopmund to Walvis Bay road tender in April 2016 when he indeed recommended its cancellation and re-advertisement.

“I clearly stated that this tender was riddled with corruption, and should be cancelled and be re-advertised. But such recommendation was brushed aside, and the tender was eventually awarded to the third most expensive tenderer, Unik, instead of the cheapest and the best tenderer, as evaluated by the consulting engineer,” he added.

Sankwasa told The Namibian this week that he planned to intervene in the current tenders as they were overpriced, and he wanted the permanent secretary to correct the matter.

“As permanent secretary, I expect him [Goeiemann] to act in the public interest of the country and a duty to protect state resources,” he reiterated.

Sankwasa suggested that if the material is too expensive, then why not get material from another source that's cheaper.

“It just boils down to corruption,” he charged.

NOTHING WRONG

RA chief executive Lutombi told The Namibian yesterday that they are aware of Sankwasa's concerns, but denied that they committed the government to overpriced roads contracts.

“All the tenders that were awarded, of all current projects, went through a competitive advertised tender process. Hence, all the tenders were awarded regarding the price and technical expertise in line with the Roads Authority's procurement process,” he said.

Lutombi further stated that they responded to Sankwasa's letter with a detailed report on the cost of the dual-carriage freeways versus single carriageways.

The ministry of works then submitted their proposal to the Central Procurement Board (CPB) for scrutiny, and for the board to indicate whether it was done legally.

“We are still waiting for a response from the CPB,” he said.

Lutombi added that the risks of going for underpriced contracts include poor quality, and the project not being completed on time.

The RA advertised in newspapers last week for a consultant to carry out a study on road construction prices.

The three highways have a controversial past.

The Namibian reported in 2016 that the RA and the ministry of works committed the government to contracts of more than N$2 billion without following procedures, and claiming that they were made a priority by “the highest offices”.

The N$2 billion will have to be paid over two years, but the finance ministry, already under pressure from massive cash shortages, was forced to find N$800 million to pay road construction companies.
Source - Namibian

sOURCE

June 27, 2018

Kuwait Plans Second Phase for Airport

Ministry pushes tender to build second phase of new airport



KUWAIT: The Ministry of Public Works (MPW) recently contacted the Central Agency for Public Tenders (CAPT) requesting permission to announce offering a tender to build the second phase of the new airport project. The tender includes facility buildings, construction of the road leading to the new terminal and creating parking spaces.
Bidders have 60 days starting from the date in which the tender’s announcement is published in the national gazette ‘Kuwait Al-Youm’ to study the tender, the sources said, adding that a preliminary meeting would be held 21 days after publication. The sources added that 8.4 percent of the new airport project had been completed so far.
In other news, auditory bodies postponed awarding a tender offered by the Public Authority for Agricultural Affairs and Fish Resources (PAAAFR) to register and vaccinate animals in Kuwait to one of the applying companies, well-informed sources said. CAPT decided to postpone its final decision until complaints made by of two of the applying bidders were studied and investigated, the sources added. The project aims at vaccinating animals and protecting them against contagious diseases, namely those that can infect humans, the sources explained.
‘Bachelors’ residence
Ahmadi municipality’s engineering follow up department announced disconnecting electric current in 112 houses inhabited by ‘bachelors’ in private residential areas in the governorate. This step was made as part of efforts to address violations in residential areas where owners of government homes rent rooms in their houses to single expatriate men in violation of the law.
Hiring teachers
The Ministry of Education (MOE) contacted the Civil Service Commission (CSC) to receive permission to dispatch committees to interview and hire teachers from Egypt, Jordan, Palestine and Tunisia by the end of the month, assistant undersecretary for public education Fatima Al-Kandary announced. Meanwhile, Kandary added that the supplemental exams were going according to schedule according to the same procedures followed during the finals’ exams. She added that fewer students were sitting for the exams, making them more comfortable. Further, Kandary said that considerable numbers of evening students did not show up to the exams, adding that those would be considered doublers. She also said that some students were caught cheating red-handed.
Voluntary teams
Following the end of a grace period given by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labor’s (MSAL) community development department to all voluntary teams taking part in the ‘Bader’ project to update their information, MSAL is currently preparing lists of the teams that failed to do so to be submitted to minister Hind Al-Sabeeh for consultancy. “They will most likely be written off,” informed sources expected.  The sources explained that the total number of registered voluntary teams was 182, while only 78 of them were active and effective, which means that 104 of them had been graced a fortnight to rectify their status.
By A Saleh
Source- Kuwait times

June 13, 2018

Preteder Walkaround

NHAI to do pre-tender health check on highways, share data with bidders

Appoints Crisil, Deloitte and Mazars to conduct due diligence of nine stretches that would be tendered this month

Megha Manchanda  |  New Delhi 
road, road construction, highway
The Highways Authority of India (NHAI), which is currently tendering road monetisation projects, has started of a unique data-sharing plan with prospective bidders. It is undertaking the task of conducting due diligence for the contracts prior to their bidding.
will ascertain the health of TOT or toll-operate-transfer projects, which would then be offered to international investors for their operation and maintenance.
An NHAI-appointed consultant would establish a data bank of the road assets that would be tendered. These O&M contracts are usually for 20-25 years and hence the prospective bidders require a detailed blueprint of the contract before submitting bids.
“Three consultants have been appointed--Crisil, and Mazars--for conducting the pre-bid due diligence of the nine stretches that would be tendered by this month,” a industry executive told Business Standard.
As part of the due diligence process, the consultants would establish how good the asset is, the age of the asset and material used in the construction of that road. The data created would then be put in public domain by the for the prospective bidders to study before submission of their bids.
Three bundles of highway stretches would be tendered by the NHAI this month. A batch of nine stretches across Odisha, West Bengal, Assam and Bihar, a bunch of seven stretches across Tamil Nadu, Telangana, Rajasthan and Gujarat and another bundle of 10 stretches across UP, Bihar and Jharkhand.
This is the second round of bidding for TOT projects after the one in March, when a joint venture of Macquarie and Ashoka Buildcon bagged the first bundle of road monetization projects for Rs 96.8 billion.
These projects were offered to the international players after the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs, in August 2016, authorized the NHAI to monetize public funded highway projects, which are operational and are generating toll revenues for at least two years after the commercial operations date through the TOT model.
NHAI to do pre-tender health check on highways, share data with bidders
Under the TOT model, the concessionaire pays a one-time fee upfront and operates the toll for 30 years. This model is applicable to engineering, procurement and construction and the built, operate and transfer (annuity) highway projects that were commissioned at least two years ago.
Funds generated from highway monetisation would be used for new infrastructure programmes such as the Bharatmala.
First Published: Tue, June 12 2018. 22:22 IST