Showing posts with label Oxidized Asphalt. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Oxidized Asphalt. Show all posts

December 1, 2018

Procurement Model - Progressive or Blocking


SHINOVENE IMMANUEL and TJIPENANDJAMBI KUHANGA
THE Central Procurement Board has told the Roads Authority to re-advertise two highway road tenders worth N$1,4 billion.
However, the Roads Authority, a parastatal tasked with constructing and managing national roads, believes that the procurement process will delay the projects for more years.

The highways in question include the Windhoek to Okahandja road which would be extended by 21 kilometres for N$1 billion while the Swakopmund to Walvis Bay road will be extended by eight kilometres for N$435 million.

A person familiar with this matter said the Central Procurement Board informed the Roads Authority about its decision last month.

The Namibian understands that the tender agency initially told the roads parastatal to also re-advertise the Windhoek to Hosea Kutako International Airport tender, but that decision is still being discussed.

The decision by the Central Procurement Board comes after Roads Authority chief executive Conrad Lutombi wrote to the transport ministry on 2 February 2018, recommending that the three companies which are currently constructing the highways should be given extensions to work on the next kilometres, which would rule out advertising the tenders.

The Roads Authority has in the past warned that these projects would be delayed and it will cost the government more money if the contracts are re-advertised. The Roads Authority believes that it will be cheaper to continue with the current contractors and save up to N$251 million.

The parastatal is of the opinion that re-advertising the Windhoek to Okahandja road, scheduled for completion by next year as part of the 'Harambee road projects' goals, will delay the project.

Sources said officials at the Roads Authority believe that the Central Procurement Board does not have the powers to award these road contracts because they were awarded by the previous tender regime, which gave parastatals powers to hand out tenders.

The Namibian understands that the Central Procurement Board approached attorney general Albert Kawana earlier this year to obtain a legal opinion on whether the tender agency has powers to award or extend contracts issued by the previous procurement regime.

Kawana declined to comment yesterday while chairperson of the Central Procurement Board Patrick Swartz did not answer a question sent to him on Tuesday.

In the meantime, uncertainty faces the completion of the Windhoek to Okahandja two-way road.

The initial plan was to construct the Windhoek to Okahandja road concurrently in the final phase of the project, but the tender has been delayed for more than two years.

“There is no way we can complete the Okahandja road by next year as promised in the Harambee Prosperity Plan,” a person familiar with the project told The Namibian this week.

Roads Authority spokesperson Hileni Fillemon said the construction of the Windhoek to Okahandja section 4A road is progressing. The current phase consists of the 27km road from Döbra River to the Omakunde interchange.

“Progress on this project is at 78%. Five bridges have been fully completed, and works are progressing well on the bridges/interchanges that we are currently busy with,” she said.

The section is set to be completed by September 2019, she added.

The section 4B, which is 21km, covers the road from the Osona military base to the Otjiwarongo junction – behind Okahandja on the southern side, and it will be turned into a highway.

“The design for this section has been completed, and the Roads Authority is currently engaging the government to secure funds for this section,” Fillemon continued.

The spokesperson said phase one of the Windhoek to Hosea Kutako International Airport road, which stretches from Mandume Ndemufayo Avenue to Sam Nujoma Drive, is 60% completed.

BUDGET CUT

The finance ministry and the transport ministry have over the years clashed over the roads tender. The finance ministry bluntly blamed the transport ministry for committing the government to road contracts worth more than N$2 billion without consulting treasury. Deputy transport minister Sankwasa James Sankwasa said in a letter earlier this year that the roads contracts were riddled with corruption.

There is evidence that the finance ministry reduced the initial budget for the three highway projects.

Documents provided by the transport ministry show that the finance ministry chopped the budget for the three roads projects by N$292 million when the national budget was revised last month.

The Windhoek to Okahandja road, which had an initial budget of N$241 million, was reduced by N$90 million, leaving the project with N$151 million to construct the ongoing road project.

The Windhoek to Hosea Kutako road project was reduced by N$102 million and left with N$47 million. This road is set to be funded by the African Development Bank and a Chinese grant.

The Swakopmund to Walvis Bay two-way road, which had a N$149 million budget, was cut to N$47 million, reducing the project amount by N$102 million.

These project cuts were part of the massive cuts faced by the transport ministry last month.
The ministry's entire budget for this year was reduced by N$700 million from N$2,2 billion to N$1,5 billion.

Director in the works department at the Ministry of Works and Transport, Anneline Black told The Namibian two weeks ago that the finance ministry did not consult them when it chopped the budget of 29 out of 44 projects at the cost of N$700 million.

“The Ministry of Finance did not consult the line ministries on the budget cuts of the development budget,” Black said.The finance ministry did not respond to questions about the lack of consultations.
The ministry of works indicated that the upgrading of the railway network was also cut by N$103 million from an initial budget of N$371 million.
The transport ministry is also faced with a poor implementation record.

Black, who was acting as permanent secretary of the transport ministry, said 21 out of 44 projects were not implemented for this financial year due to the lack of money.

The ministry did not respond to questions about the projects budgeted for but not implemented.
Black, however, said the ministry is still making some progress, despite the budget cuts.

“After having looked at all the affected projects, I can in all honesty not see how these project cuts will not negatively impact these projects at all,” she added.

Source - The Namibian

November 23, 2018

Road and Rail Plans

Victoria's debt level to double under Labor road and rail plans

Today Victorian Labor pledged to kick-start work on Melbourne's $15.8 billion North East Link toll road on day-one back in office.
The 26km road, which will connect the M80 ring road at Greensborough with the Eastern Freeway, was first proposed by Labor in 2008.
Premier Daniel Andrews recommitted to the project in 2016 and has already put more than $200 million into planning and design.
This morning he promised to call for construction tenders on Monday if successful at the ballot box.
"The tender process will begin on Monday and I know that there will be significant interest from construction companies both here and abroad to get on and build this road," he told reporters.
He expects construction to start in 2020 and the road to open in 2027. The road will be fully funded by taxpayers.

The premier also pledged three more crossing removals at Deer Park and Ardeer.

The premier alongside transport minister Jacinta Allen.
The premier alongside transport minister Jacinta Allen. (AAP)
The road and rail plans would increase net debt to12 percent of Gross State Product, borrowing $25.6 billion to build North East Link, the Airport Rail Link and level crossing removals.
“We pay some, and our kids… who will be the principal beneficiaries, will also make a contribution to the projects that are so vitally important,” Treasurer Tim Pallas told 9News.
Mr Pallas said the state can maintain its AAA credit rating through a dedicated infrastructure fund that would take a $2.3 billion dividend from Victorian insurers over a four-year period.
The treasurer added that there is “no need for new taxes” to fulfil the government’s election commitments.
“I am not going to constrain the Victorian economy by not being able to make changes where we see the changes are appropriate,” he said.
Both Labor and the Liberal Party have promised to build the North East Link toll road, although Opposition Leader Matthew Guy has said he will review the plans if he wins office.
Mr Guy's seat of Bulleen is affected by the current proposed route.
Roads Minister Luke Donnellan said a review of the project by a Liberal-Nationals government would delay construction.
"A vote for the Liberal party ... will mean it will be delayed, continue to be delayed forever," he said.
Melbourne North-East link design. (AAP)
"The last four years that the Liberal party were in they simply didn't get a major project started and completed in their term."
Mr Andrews said the project "stacks up", unlike the dumped East West Link toll road, which cost the state more than $1 billion to scrap in 2014.
"We have got to accept funnelling people through the centre of the city is not the answer," he added.
"Finishing the ring road will allow people to move around the city that's what stacks up."
Mr Andrews then set off for Deer Park, in the state's west, to announce the removal of three rail level crossings, some of Labor's hit-list of 25 if re-elected.
Victorians go to the polls on Saturday.
With AAP
Watch the full news bulletin on 9Now

November 16, 2018

Indonesian Road Contracts

WSBP Aims New Contracts Value of IDR10.39 Trillion in 2019

PT Waskita Beton Precast Tbk
JAKARTA, NNC - As of October 2018, PT Waskita Beton Precast Tbk (IDX:WSBP) has successfully secured new contracts value of IDR4.56 trillion from 2018 new contracts target of IDR6.6 trillion.
The new contracts originated from several large projects being supplied by WSBP, including additional work on the Cibitung-Cilincing Toll Road Project, additional work on the Kulonprogo I Project, additional work on RDMP (Refinery Development Master Plan) RU V Balikpapan, and other projects.
President Director of PT Waskita Beton Precast Tbk Jarot Subana said that within the remaining two months, the company will focus on pursuing the target of obtaining contract value this year.
"For this reason, WSBP has also obtained several potential projects that can increase the value of WSBP new contracts until the end of this year, namely the Pekanbaru-Dumai Toll Road Project, Kuala Tanjung-Indrapura Toll Road Project, additional work for the KLBM (Krian-Legundi- Bunder-Manyar) Toll Road Project and a number of other projects," said Jarot, Wednesday (11/14/2018).
For information, the contract value target of IDR6.6 trillion is the revised result of the company's Work Plan and Budget, because previously WSBP projected new contract value of IDR8.3 trillion.
The change was due to several major project tenders being postponed including the Probolinggo-Banyuwangi Toll Road Project, Balikpapan Penajam Bridge and the Singosari-Batu Toll Road Project.
Meanwhile, in 2019, WSBP targets the acquisition of new contracts value of IDR10.39 trillion from both internal and external projects.
PT Waskita Beton Precast Tbk was formed officially as a subsidiary of PT Waskita Karya (Persero) Tbk (IDX:WSKT) on October 7, 2014.
WSBP is a company producing precast and ready mix concrete with the current largest production capacity in Indonesia. The company listed its first shares on the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX) on September 20, 2016.

Credit Union HQ Construction to begin

Construction work is poised to start on a new headquarters for one of Ireland’s largest credit unions after a breakthrough in a legal dispute which stalled the project for years.
The chief executive of Bishopstown Credit Union in Cork, which has almost 21,000 members and assets of €150m, confirmed that the dispute with Dunnes Stores over a small section of land next to the earmarked site on Curraheen Road, has been settled to everyone’s satisfaction.
Pictured, on site, after the official contract signing, were members of the Board of Directors and officials from Cumnor Construction and project team. Pic: Brian Lougheed
The settlement, which did not involve any financial payments, has cleared the way for the signing of contracts for the construction of the credit union’s new headquarters on the site of the former Viscount Bar - plans for which were first unveiled in 2013 - two years after the credit union bought the bar and demolished it.
A planning appeal to An Bórd Pleanála delayed the project by 2.5 years before the dispute with Dunnes further delayed building. The site has lain vacant and surrounded by hoarding for several years.
But Mr Kenny confirmed last night that builders will be on site within days after a €5.835m contract was awarded to Cumnor Construction following a competitive tender process.
Construction is expected to take a year to complete.
He also defended the cost and scale of the project and said it will ensure that the branch will be able to cater for growth and future development of credit union sector which has seen many mergers in recent years.
Chairman of Bishopstown Credit Union, David P Barry, welcomed the signing of the contract: “We are now re-establishing our presence in the heart of Bishopstown.
"Work will commence this month and it is intended that the building will be completed and fitted out in 12-months.
As one of the largest community-based credit unions in Ireland, with assets of €150m and a staff of 30 people, we have outgrown our current premises on the Wilton Road and our new headquarters will enable us to make further progress as a key local financial service provider.
“We are a strong and secure financial institution which has made significant investment in IT as a feature of the credit union’s success, and we now have one of the most advanced service delivery channels in the country," he added.
Founded in 1967, Bishopstown Credit Union originally operated from the crypt of Dennehy’s Cross church.
At one time, it had four branches - the headquarters it opened on Wilton Rd in 1997, the branch in Wilton Shopping Centre, as well as offices on the Curraheen Road and in Ballinhassig.
It closed the Curraheen Road and Ballinhassig branches as part of an overall cost-saving drive which achieved some €500,000 in savings.
Once the new building is ready, the credit union headquarters will relocate to Curraheen Road.
The Wilton Road premises, and the adjoining property which it also owns, will be sold - the proceeds of which will help offset the construction costs - and the Wilton Shopping Centre branch will be retained.

September 28, 2018

Liverpool Road Tender

Liverpool City Council is looking for contractors to work on a four-year highways framework worth up to £280m.
The framework, one of four platforms the council is creating to invest in roads and new housing, is divided into three lots with projects ranging from £250,000 to £12m for planned highways works including patching and potholes, ground investigation, piling, remedial works, trail pits, bridges and tunnels.
There will be 12 places in total on the framework, across the three lots, with up to 24 suppliers invited to tender.
Interested parties must complete the selection questionnaire by Wednesday 17 October at the Pro Contract website.
The highways frameworks have been set up to enable the delivery of the Better Roads programme, which was launched in 2014, the council said. It added that to date, more than 100 oads have benefitted, including a £1.6m upgrade to Park Lane and the current works dualling the northern gateway to the city centre.
Further procurement frameworks are also being designed to assist the Foundations housing company, which is to be given “stiff targets” to bolster apprenticeships in the region’s construction sector. The frameworks can also can be utilised by other local bodies to contract works.
Mayor Joe Anderson said: Liverpool’s roads are in need of a dramatic overhaul.
“The funding for the roads is in place and Foundations has now been established so the time has now come to fine tune the plans and start delivering.
“To do this, and to make it easier for Liverpool companies to navigate our tendering process, the council’s procurement team has created our first bespoke frameworks.
“This is a watershed moment for the council and symbolises the effort and commitment the entire organisation is undertaking to change the way we operate to be more business friendly so together the public and private sector can make a real difference to the future of the city.”
Source - Placenorhtwest

August 15, 2018

Road Tender Bribes

Israeli tycoon quizzed over Kenya roads tender bribes
A SECTION OF THE MAU-SUMMIT-KERICHO-NYAMASARIA ROAD UNDER CONSTRUCTION WHICH WAS UNDERTAKEN BY AN ISRAEL COMPANY WHOSE OFFICIALS ARE THE SUBJECT OF BRIBERY INQUIRY CLAIMS
A SECTION OF THE MAU-SUMMIT-KERICHO-NYAMASARIA ROAD UNDER CONSTRUCTION WHICH WAS UNDERTAKEN BY AN ISRAEL COMPANY WHOSE OFFICIALS ARE THE SUBJECT OF BRIBERY INQUIRY CLAIMS. FILE PHOTO | NMG  
Israeli police on Sunday questioned Israeli-American billionaire Shari Arison in connection with an ongoing bribery investigation into the country’s largest construction firm, Shikun & Binui, which is alleged to have bribed Kenyan officials to win lucrative road tenders.
In a joint statement on Sunday, the Israeli police and the Israel Securities Authority said their investigation was focusing on suspicions that the company bribed foreign government officials to advance projects worth hundreds of millions of dollars in Kenya and other countries.
Ms Arison was summoned on Sunday along with another executive of Arison Group, Efrat Peled, by the Israeli police’s anti-corruption unit, Arison Group said in a statement.
“They cooperated fully and are certain there was no flaw in their conduct, and that this will also be the conclusion of the enforcement agencies,” the firm was quoted saying by Reuters.
Investigation into the Tel Aviv-based construction group is expected to also place a section of current and former Kenyan Transport ministry officials on the spot over their involvement in suspected corruption.
Israel police on February 20, opened investigations into the activities of Shikun & Binui’s former senior managers suspected of involvement in the bribery in Kenya.
The firm works in Kenya through its subsidiary Solel Boneh International Holdings (SBI Holdings).
SBI Holdings is the company that Nairobi picked to build the World Bank-funded Mau Summit-Kericho-Kisumu Highway at a cost of Sh14 billion in 2010.
Shikun & Binui said in February that four current and former employees of a foreign subsidiary had been detained for questioning by Israeli police on suspicion of bribery in Kenya and other African nations.
SBI, which is one of the largest contraction firms in Israel, has been bidding for other lucrative construction projects in Kenya.
The probe has turned the heat on those who served at the helm of the Transport and Infrastructure ministry at the time the suspect contracts were awarded.

July 20, 2018

Over Priced Road Contracts


THE transport ministry rejected a plan by the Roads Authority to extend three road contracts valued at N$1,6 billion to three companies without publicly advertising the tenders.
Currently, there are three highways under construction – the Swakopmund to Walvis Bay, the Windhoek to Hosea Kutako and the Windhoek to Okahandja.

The Swakopmund to Walvis Bay highway is being constructed by Chinese-owned company Unik Construction Engineering Namibia and its Namibian partner, Thohi Construction for N$958 million.

The N$1 billion contract for the contruction of a section of the Windhoek to Okahandja highway was awarded to the Italian construction company CMC and their Namibian partner Otesa Civil Engineering, while another N$1 billion contract for the Windhoek to Hosea Kutako highway went to the China Railway Seventh Group and Onamagongwa Trading Enterprise.

Two of the highways – Windhoek to Hosea Kutako and Windhoek to Okahandja – are supposed to be completed by January 2019, while the Swakopmund to Walvis Bay highway should be done by June next year.

Works and Transport permanent secretary Willem Goeiemann asked the RA last year to present a strategy on how the parastatal plans to implement the three projects to meet deadlines.

RA chief executive Conrad Lutombi wrote to Goeie­mann on 2 February 2018, recommending that the three companies which are currently constructing the highways should be given extensions to work on the next kilometres, which would rule out advertising the tenders.

According to the Roads Authority (RA), the Windhoek to Hosea Kutako International Airport road would be extended by three kilometres at a cost of N$150 million, while the Swakopmund to Walvis Bay road will increase by eight kilometres for N$435 million. The Windhoek to Okahandja road would be extended by 21 kilometres for a whopping N$1 billion.

The RA stated that the three road extensions would cost a combined N$1,6 billion, and that allowing continuity would save the government N$147 million.

The savings, according to the parastatal, include the fact that the companies would not need to set up a new construction camp. The camp consists of workers' accommodation.

THE LOW ROAD

Works deputy minister Sankwasa James Sankwasa, however, rejected this proposal to extend the roads, and blasted the RA for accepting inflated tenders.

Sankwasa rejected the proposal in two letters he wrote to works minister John Mutorwa and Goeiemann on 27 February and 2 May 2018.

“I am not in a position to agree with the recommendations to award the extensions of construction work to the existing tenderers,” he said, suggesting that the RA should instead go for a public tender, supervised by the ministry of works.

“Should any tenderer not quote within the confines or rates of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region, the government should reject such tender,” he emphasised.

According to him, Namibian road projects, compared to other southern African countries, are expensive.

The deputy minister said he researched Namibian road construction costs compared to other countries, mainly Zambia, Botswana, Zimbabwe and South Africa.

“I discovered that nearly all SADC countries construct roads of bitumen (tar) standards at approximately N$5 million to N$8 million per kilometre, depending on the topography of the area where the road is being constructed,” he said.

The deputy minister further said that about 10 years ago, Namibia was constructing roads at an average cost below N$5 million per kilometre.

“This seems to have changed overnight, to where Namibia is constructing at the cost of N$12 to N$15 million per kilometre,” he added.

The three roads are priority projects under the Harambee Prosperity Plan, President Hage Geingob's signature development plan, which has promised better roads up to 2020.

“Does government have to undertake overpriced projects because they are Harambee projects?” the deputy minister asked.

“The sudden escalation in the costs of road construction and all other construction works in Namibia requires an urgent investigation, and the halting of such overpricing practices”, he stressed.

For instance, Sankwasa said the Swakopmund to Walvis Bay road was overpriced by around N$60 million, compared to the initial cost government budgeted for.

The deputy minister said he objected to the awarding of the Swakopmund to Walvis Bay road tender in April 2016 when he indeed recommended its cancellation and re-advertisement.

“I clearly stated that this tender was riddled with corruption, and should be cancelled and be re-advertised. But such recommendation was brushed aside, and the tender was eventually awarded to the third most expensive tenderer, Unik, instead of the cheapest and the best tenderer, as evaluated by the consulting engineer,” he added.

Sankwasa told The Namibian this week that he planned to intervene in the current tenders as they were overpriced, and he wanted the permanent secretary to correct the matter.

“As permanent secretary, I expect him [Goeiemann] to act in the public interest of the country and a duty to protect state resources,” he reiterated.

Sankwasa suggested that if the material is too expensive, then why not get material from another source that's cheaper.

“It just boils down to corruption,” he charged.

NOTHING WRONG

RA chief executive Lutombi told The Namibian yesterday that they are aware of Sankwasa's concerns, but denied that they committed the government to overpriced roads contracts.

“All the tenders that were awarded, of all current projects, went through a competitive advertised tender process. Hence, all the tenders were awarded regarding the price and technical expertise in line with the Roads Authority's procurement process,” he said.

Lutombi further stated that they responded to Sankwasa's letter with a detailed report on the cost of the dual-carriage freeways versus single carriageways.

The ministry of works then submitted their proposal to the Central Procurement Board (CPB) for scrutiny, and for the board to indicate whether it was done legally.

“We are still waiting for a response from the CPB,” he said.

Lutombi added that the risks of going for underpriced contracts include poor quality, and the project not being completed on time.

The RA advertised in newspapers last week for a consultant to carry out a study on road construction prices.

The three highways have a controversial past.

The Namibian reported in 2016 that the RA and the ministry of works committed the government to contracts of more than N$2 billion without following procedures, and claiming that they were made a priority by “the highest offices”.

The N$2 billion will have to be paid over two years, but the finance ministry, already under pressure from massive cash shortages, was forced to find N$800 million to pay road construction companies.
Source - Namibian

sOURCE

July 12, 2018

Asphalting in Rain

A New Innovative Technology for Road Asphalting in the rain

innovative technology for road asphalting

Asphalting in the rain: The Challenge

In February 2018, Sacyr approached ennomotive to solve a complex challenge: an innovative technology for road asphalting in the rain.
Traditionally, the asphalting of roads requires special humidity and temperature conditions to ensure the good quality of the surface. However, in tropical countries where it rains heavily and frequently, paving is extremely difficult, the quality of the asphalt is not always optimal, and oftentimes the operation needs to be halted.
Prior to this challenge, a few potential market solutions had been considered and tested, but they all solved the problem partially, so the expected effectiveness and results were not entirely satisfactory.
Sacyr was looking for a process or an asphalt mix that enabled the paving under heavy rain conditions and the quality of the final product needed to be similar to the asphalt obtained in dry weather.
For 6 weeks, 35 engineers from 10 countries accepted the challenge and submitted different solutions. After a thorough evaluation, Sacyr picked the two solutions that best met the evaluation criteria and awarded the winners, the Portuguese Civil Engineer Henrique Borges Miranda, and José Manuel Sanz, from Spain.
We have contacted Henrique Miranda to learn about his experience and motivations to compete in this challenge. Here you can read the full interview.

Henrique Miranda, an asphalt expert from Portugal

innovative technology for road asphalting

Can you introduce yourself briefly? What is your more relevant working experience?

My name is Henrique Manuel Borges Miranda, I’m from Portugal, and I live in the beautiful city of Lisbon.
Academically, I graduated in 2005 as Civil Engineer at ISEL (Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa), where I had the honor to receive the award for the best civil engineering student.
In 2008, I completed my Master of Science (Transports – Design and Construction of Transportation Infrastructures) at IST, with the collaboration of the National Laboratory of Civil Engineering, where I experimentally studied the fatigue behavior of asphalt rubber mixtures.
In 2016, I completed my Ph.D. in Civil Engineering at IST, with the collaboration of the National Laboratory of Civil Engineering, where I experimentally studied Stone Mastic Asphalt – mix design, production, application, and performance.
Regarding my professional experience, I started to work at ISEL as a monitor in 2003, past to assistant professor in 2008 and adjunct professor in 2017. I am also responsible for the courses on pavement engineering and topography.
During all this time, I simultaneously worked as road and pavement engineer for about 12 years, regarding, namely, road and pavement design, development of new materials (rubberized binders), construction and maintenance of highway pavements. More recently, I have been additionally invited to work as a researcher in the Research Centre for Territory, Transports, and Environment in Portugal.

What challenges have you participated in? Which do you like most?

Life is a challenge, and I like challenges, especially when they require thinking differently. Different is good. Every time we accept a challenge, we have the opportunity to grow no matter whether we win or not.
Fortunately, in 2017 I had the honor of winning the civil engineering innovation award for young engineers given by the Portuguese Association of Engineers. This innovation award was related to the patent I developed during my Ph.D. It was about a new method to design, in a day, stone mastic asphalt using just a computer or a smartphone, as opposed to the several weeks needed in the laboratory for the same mix design.
In terms of online challenges, this was my first one with ennomotive, and from what I had the opportunity to experience, it was a great competition with 35 international participants. This being my first ennomotive challenge, with such hard competition, it only makes me prouder and very honored to receive this award from Sacyr and Ennomotive.
I truly hope that this will be the first of many other challenges in which I participate and, if possible, win. At least, I will work even harder to try and accomplish that.
Having said that, I like challenges that involve the development of new materials/solutions that make our lives easier, not only in civil engineering and pavement engineering but in general, just because I like the feeling of thinking outside the box. It gives us space to dream of a different future than the one that we live in today.

How did you come up with the winning solution?

In the solution for “asphalting under heavy rain”, I basically focused on the main question to solve, without even knowing other possible existing solutions. I think that gave me the required mental space to develop a new solution, out of which we can make a new patent now. Inspiration came both from my background in pavement engineering and from the challenge proposed by Sacyr and ennomotive. Congratulations to them for bringing a good question to solve.
I truly hope this award inspires engineers in Portugal to do the same since I’m the first Portuguese Civil Engineer to get awarded at ennomotive. We have many extraordinary civil engineers, I see that every day with my students.

What is the level of innovation in the Portuguese Universities? Is there any technological area you would like to highlight in Portugal?

I cannot speak in the name of other Portuguese Universities, but I can tell you my experience at ISEL (Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa). Regarding pavement engineering, we are focused in establishing new research platforms about, namely, circular economy, and the development of new road materials such as new rubberized binder technology that allows the use of rubber powder of old life tires till 50% on the binder without losing storage stability.
Source- ennomotive