Showing posts with label bitumen exporter. Show all posts
Showing posts with label bitumen exporter. Show all posts

January 14, 2019

Project Delays

Mt Kenya leaders, locals differ on pace of Ruto projects

SUNDAY JANUARY 13 2019
William Ruto
This image taken on January 9, 2019 shows a section of Mwiyogo-Endarasha road in Nyeri whose construction was launched by Deputy President William Ruto last year. PHOTO | JOSEPH KANYI | NATION MEDIA GROUP 
By NATION TEAM
More by this Author
Slow implementation of projects launched by Deputy President William Ruto in his tours of Mt Kenya has angered residents.
Following President Uhuru Kenyatta’s statement in Mombasa criticising Mt Kenya leaders for accusing him of neglecting the region, focus has shifted to the projects launched by his deputy over the last one year.
On New Year’s Eve, Gatundu South MP Moses Kuria accused the President of sidelining Central Kenya despite the region supporting him in elections.
Mr Kuria has since backtracked, claiming his comments were misinterpreted.
However, his Bahati counterpart Kimani Ngunjiri is unapologetic, saying the President has failed.
CONTRACTORS
A spot check by the Nation revealed that most of the projects launched by Dr Ruto in the region have started but with hardly any activities on the ground.
In Nyeri, most of the road projects are ongoing albeit at a very slow pace.
Residents are worried that the projects may stall if their leaders fail to pile pressure on the national government.
In Kieni alone, Dr Ruto launched three road projects worth Sh4.4 billion: the first two in February and the third one in October.
Residents said contractors were dragging their feet despite a promise that the roads would be completed in one year.
“The contractors are not consistent when undertaking some of these projects. Sometimes they can go away for two months and we are left wondering whether these roads will ever be completed,” Mr Samuel Muriuki said.
DEADLINE
For instance, the contractor working on the 13km Kanyagia-Endarasha road is on site but very little activity is going on.
Casual labourers are digging up trenches on the side of the road while the machinery is lying idle at Endarasha shopping centre.
However, area MP Kanini Kega said the contractor had been given nine months to complete the job, refuting claims that it was behind schedule.
“Work is on course in all the road projects and none of them has stalled. I cannot complain about the pace of implementation,” he said.
Mr Kega lashed out at those claiming Dr Ruto launched ‘ghost’ projects, saying his constituents are contented with the work the Jubilee administration is doing.
Mathira MP Rigathi Gachagua defended the Jubilee government's development record.
He cited an advertisement by a road agency for the tarmacking of two roads in his area that will cost Sh3 billion.
ROADS
The Kenya Rural Roads Authority on Thursday announced three tenders for the tarmacking of roads in Nyeri and Migori counties.
The 43km Marua-Kiamariga road that leads to the State Lodge is among the highways that will be tarmacked in the current financial year.
Mr Gachagua said this was evidence that his constituency had not been sidelined in development.
“I cannot speak about development in the Mt Kenya region because I was not elected there and cannot pretend to know what takes place in the region. I only know about Mathira where I am elected, and it’s the only place that concerns me,” he said.
On January 12 last year, while attending a funeral in Kiambu, Dr Ruto announced that the Jubilee administration would in the 2018/2019 financial year allocate Sh800 million to rehabilitate the Marige-Gathiru-ini road, which he had used to get to the burial venue.
PROJECTS
However, five months to the end of the financial year, nothing has happened on the 23km road and the Head of State is yet to launch 50km of link roads in the region as promised by Dr Ruto.
The government, he said, was also working on another Sh17 billion water project dubbed Ruiru Two in Githunguri and two other dams in Kinale, in Lari, and Gatundu South, but no works have started on the ground yet.
Other projects which have been launched in the county are the 47km Uplands-Githunguri-Ruiru road, which is expected to cost Sh4.6 billion, and the 26km Githunguri–Kagwe–Kimende road (Moi Road), whose estimated cost is Sh2.4 billion.
The two projects were commissioned by Dr Ruto in June and September last year respectively.
On the same day Dr Ruto commissioned Moi Road, he also launched Wangige-Nyathuna-Ngecha road that cuts through Kabete and Limuru constituencies.
PR SHOW
Works at Uplands-Githunguri-Ruiru road started but have since inexplicably stopped, while at Moi Road and Wangige-Nyathuna-Ngecha road the project is yet to start.
Earthmovers, which were used during the launch, left the site immediately.
“It seems like it was a public relations exercise since close to four months down the line, not even an inch has been excavated and the machines left almost immediately,” Mr James Kioge, a resident of Kagwe who witnessed the launch of Moi Road project, said.
In Meru, Dr Ruto launched the construction of Thangatha dam in Tigania East in August last year with a promise that it will be complete in six months.
A spot check showed that the contractor was on site with excavation works ongoing.
Kirinyaga County residents have also protested against the slow implementation of road projects which were launched by the DP.
PROTEST
Residents said the Njegas-Kianjege and the Ngaru-Gakoigo roads, whose construction Dr Ruto launched, are still in bad shape.
"These are very crucial roads and the contractors who won tenders should stop dragging their feet," Mr Njau Ndegwa said.
Residents urged the DP to act tough on lazy contractors. "For us to benefit, Dr Ruto should not spare the contractors who are not doing their jobs faster," Ms Mary Wangui, another resident, said.
They also observed that the construction of the controversial Sh1.2 billion Kutus-Kiamutugu-Githure road - which Dr Ruto toured last year - had stalled.
A contractor was awarded the tender two years ago but the project halted after only 5km was tarmacked.
Gichugu residents, where the project is located, have threatened to stage a demonstration to protest against the stalling of the project.
Reporting by Eric Wainaina, David Muchui, Grace Gitau and George Munene.
source- Nation

July 12, 2018

Asphalting in Rain

A New Innovative Technology for Road Asphalting in the rain

innovative technology for road asphalting

Asphalting in the rain: The Challenge

In February 2018, Sacyr approached ennomotive to solve a complex challenge: an innovative technology for road asphalting in the rain.
Traditionally, the asphalting of roads requires special humidity and temperature conditions to ensure the good quality of the surface. However, in tropical countries where it rains heavily and frequently, paving is extremely difficult, the quality of the asphalt is not always optimal, and oftentimes the operation needs to be halted.
Prior to this challenge, a few potential market solutions had been considered and tested, but they all solved the problem partially, so the expected effectiveness and results were not entirely satisfactory.
Sacyr was looking for a process or an asphalt mix that enabled the paving under heavy rain conditions and the quality of the final product needed to be similar to the asphalt obtained in dry weather.
For 6 weeks, 35 engineers from 10 countries accepted the challenge and submitted different solutions. After a thorough evaluation, Sacyr picked the two solutions that best met the evaluation criteria and awarded the winners, the Portuguese Civil Engineer Henrique Borges Miranda, and José Manuel Sanz, from Spain.
We have contacted Henrique Miranda to learn about his experience and motivations to compete in this challenge. Here you can read the full interview.

Henrique Miranda, an asphalt expert from Portugal

innovative technology for road asphalting

Can you introduce yourself briefly? What is your more relevant working experience?

My name is Henrique Manuel Borges Miranda, I’m from Portugal, and I live in the beautiful city of Lisbon.
Academically, I graduated in 2005 as Civil Engineer at ISEL (Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa), where I had the honor to receive the award for the best civil engineering student.
In 2008, I completed my Master of Science (Transports – Design and Construction of Transportation Infrastructures) at IST, with the collaboration of the National Laboratory of Civil Engineering, where I experimentally studied the fatigue behavior of asphalt rubber mixtures.
In 2016, I completed my Ph.D. in Civil Engineering at IST, with the collaboration of the National Laboratory of Civil Engineering, where I experimentally studied Stone Mastic Asphalt – mix design, production, application, and performance.
Regarding my professional experience, I started to work at ISEL as a monitor in 2003, past to assistant professor in 2008 and adjunct professor in 2017. I am also responsible for the courses on pavement engineering and topography.
During all this time, I simultaneously worked as road and pavement engineer for about 12 years, regarding, namely, road and pavement design, development of new materials (rubberized binders), construction and maintenance of highway pavements. More recently, I have been additionally invited to work as a researcher in the Research Centre for Territory, Transports, and Environment in Portugal.

What challenges have you participated in? Which do you like most?

Life is a challenge, and I like challenges, especially when they require thinking differently. Different is good. Every time we accept a challenge, we have the opportunity to grow no matter whether we win or not.
Fortunately, in 2017 I had the honor of winning the civil engineering innovation award for young engineers given by the Portuguese Association of Engineers. This innovation award was related to the patent I developed during my Ph.D. It was about a new method to design, in a day, stone mastic asphalt using just a computer or a smartphone, as opposed to the several weeks needed in the laboratory for the same mix design.
In terms of online challenges, this was my first one with ennomotive, and from what I had the opportunity to experience, it was a great competition with 35 international participants. This being my first ennomotive challenge, with such hard competition, it only makes me prouder and very honored to receive this award from Sacyr and Ennomotive.
I truly hope that this will be the first of many other challenges in which I participate and, if possible, win. At least, I will work even harder to try and accomplish that.
Having said that, I like challenges that involve the development of new materials/solutions that make our lives easier, not only in civil engineering and pavement engineering but in general, just because I like the feeling of thinking outside the box. It gives us space to dream of a different future than the one that we live in today.

How did you come up with the winning solution?

In the solution for “asphalting under heavy rain”, I basically focused on the main question to solve, without even knowing other possible existing solutions. I think that gave me the required mental space to develop a new solution, out of which we can make a new patent now. Inspiration came both from my background in pavement engineering and from the challenge proposed by Sacyr and ennomotive. Congratulations to them for bringing a good question to solve.
I truly hope this award inspires engineers in Portugal to do the same since I’m the first Portuguese Civil Engineer to get awarded at ennomotive. We have many extraordinary civil engineers, I see that every day with my students.

What is the level of innovation in the Portuguese Universities? Is there any technological area you would like to highlight in Portugal?

I cannot speak in the name of other Portuguese Universities, but I can tell you my experience at ISEL (Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa). Regarding pavement engineering, we are focused in establishing new research platforms about, namely, circular economy, and the development of new road materials such as new rubberized binder technology that allows the use of rubber powder of old life tires till 50% on the binder without losing storage stability.
Source- ennomotive

April 2, 2018

Pan Borneo Highway- A Game Changer

Singapore Bitumen Supplier
BINTULU: After waiting for nearly five decades, the dream of the people of Sabah and Sarawak of having a modern highway cutting across two of Malaysia’s largest states is finally being realised, with the Pan-Borneo Highway expected to be completed within five years.

Spanning 1,089km from Telok Melano and Sematan to Lawas, the mega project was initiated by the Barisan Nasional government under Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak, with an allocation of RM14.2 billion for the Sarawak portion alone.

The first phase of the project — Pan-Borneo Highway Sarawak — was officially launched by the prime minister in Bintulu on March 31, 2015. Construction along a 43km-stretch from Nyabau to the Bakun junction began soon after.

The largest infrastructure development project in the state was announced by Najib as part of the ruling coalition’s manifesto in the 13th General Election (GE13).

It made history as the first highway project, with a four-lane dual carriageway of JKR R5 standard, to be built toll-free.

The highway is expected to spur local development and enhance the people’s socio-economic status, including through the creation of many new towns along the highways and boosting the tourism sector.

“It (highway) will bring a lot of changes to Sarawak, not just in the context of development, but also by boosting the socio-economic level of its people,” said Najib.

His confidence is based on the success of the North-South Expressway (PLUS) project, which had brought numerous developmental impacts from Johor all the way to Perlis.

Najib, who is also BN chairman, said the project was seen as an “agent of change” which would be capable of bringing changes to the development of the state, especially in the rural areas and contribute positively to the socio-economy of the people, such as creating jobs and business opportunities.

In terms of implementation, he said, it benefited the local contractors through the Project-Deliver Partnerships (PDP) method, in particular Sarawak’s Bumiputera companies.

The mega project is seen as part of efforts to bridge the development gap between the Peninsula and Sabah and Sarawak, and as such, is being closely monitored to ensure it will be completed on schedule to avoid the people in both states being left waiting.

A check by the New Straits Times Press (NSTP) showed that the construction work on the first phase, involving the Nyabau to Simpang junctions, was proceeding smoothly.

A resident, Kizie Matusup, 36, said the construction of the highway was a blessing as it would make it easier for people to travel from the north to the south of the state, which was currently a half day’s journey.

“We need about 12 to 13 hours to travel from Kuching to Miri. It takes us longer during peak seasons, which is exhausting.

“Sometimes, we need to make a stop overnight in Sibu before continuing our journey, which increases our travel expenses.

“Once the highway is completed, we expect the travel time to be reduced by at least half,” he said.

The construction of the highway, which began three years ago, has already started contributing to economic growth, particularly the local food and beverage business as well as shops selling daily necessities and other local products.

In Sarawak, the 11 work packages under the first phase of the highway are being implemented accordingly, with the majority involving the upgrading of the federal road from two to four lanes, except the Melano-Sematan route.

The 32.7km-long road was a new route constructed upon the request of the late chief minister Tan Sri Adenan Satem, consisting of bridges and other facilities such as rest and recreation stops.

As for Sabah, it involves 35 work packages worth RM12.8 billion, which begins from Sindumin, Sipitang to Tawau with seven packages implemented between April 2016 and December last year.

Borneo Highway PDP (BHP) Sdn Bhd managing director Shahelmey Yahya said the handover of the remaining project package to the contractor was expected to be completed by the end of June, with 10 of them on the west coast, while another 18 packages were in the central and east coast of Sabah.

“As of March, 10 new packages have been approved by the Finance Ministry.

“Four more packages are pending approval of allocation, while 14 packages are in the tender process and the preliminary engineering assessment phase,” he said.

The project also involves the construction of three new routes, namely, Putatan-Inanam known as Kota Kinabalu Outer Ring Road (KKOR), the Tuaran-Kudat Coastal Road and the Lahad Datu Bypass.

Shahelmey said based on current developments, the supply of construction materials was sufficient, thus, he was confident that the project could be completed on schedule.

He gave his assurance that the implementation of the project was proceeding smoothly after the tender process and the packages had been handed over to the appointed contractors.

“If there are any problems, it may have been due to weather conditions and land acquisition processes that delayed the work, but we have reminded all contractors to resolve the minor issues immediately to ensure that the project can be completed on schedule,” he said.

- NST

October 5, 2017

Road Topping Tender

Brace yourself for more chaos on the roads

Biggest white topping project to date set to begin in second week of October

In tune with the State government's move towards white topping roads, the Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) has approved tenders for white topping 29 roads and six major junctions totalling to a length of 93.47 km at a cost of ₹723.71 crore. For motorists, this will be mean smooth roads, but citizens remain sceptical given the deteriorating condition of roads every monsoon.
Work is expected to begin in the second week of October simultaneously on multiple roads, and add to the traffic chaos across the city.
 
“BBMP has set a one-year deadline for completion of works on the 29 roads. We have split the work and given tenders to two firms so that the project starts simultaneously and is finished on time,” said K.T. Nagaraj, Chief Engineer, Projects, BBMP.
All roads will be provided with service ducts on either side for optic fibre cables and power cables. However, sewage and water lines will not be shifted, sources said.
White-topping is an overlay of Portland cement concrete layer over the existing asphalt layer on the road. Chief Minister Siddaramaiah and City Development Minister K.J. George are passionate votaries of the technology. Recently, Mr. Siddaramaiah had said that he would like to see roads in the city to be white-topped.
For now, however, sections on major roads like Outer Ring Road, Mysuru Road, Brigade Road, Hosur Road, Bannerghatta Road, Sarjapur Road and Tumakuru Road will be revamped.
This will be the biggest white-topping project in the city to date.
Bengaluru City Traffic Police, who have given their go-ahead for the works, said that though the project will disrupt traffic in the short run, white topping of roads is better since it provides a pothole-free ride, once completed. “We cannot block the roads. Work will be taken up on one lane while traffic will be allowed on the opposite lane,” said R. Hitendra, Additional Commissioner of Police (Traffic). He added that they would like the BBMP to press more paver machines into action to speed up the process.

September 27, 2017

Road Upgrade

Council to spend $1m on road upgrade


Last week, official manager Mark Blackburn voted to hire Palmerston-based contractor JLM Civil Works for the job.
“I think this is a straightforward contract,” he said.
A report by Melissa Moss, Environment and Strategic Support Officer, recommended awarding the tender — worth $1,058,389.64 — to the company.
Also vying for the contract was local company Ciarla Constructions, who tendered $1,413,054.80; and BMD Urban which has its head office in Queensland.
Ms Moss said each contract was weighted on local industry; past performance experience; resources and methodology knowledge and skills. “All Contractors assessed by the tender evaluation committee were identified as being capable of performing the works to the standard described in the tender documents,” she said.
“After evaluating all tenders against both the price and non-price criteria, the tender submitted by JLM Civil Works Pty Ltd, was considered to offer best value for money.”
Ms Moss said three tenders were submitted, though nine were downloaded.
Former chief executive Ricky Bruhn, who quit last week, said it was the second time the project had come before council.
“We got a better response this time round,” he said. 
“We’re hoping to start this project as soon as possible — before the rain starts.”
In July, Palmerston Council voted not to accept any tender for the Yarrawonga and Wallaby Holtze Road upgrade, as none were deemed suitable.
At the time, Mr Blackburn voted to tender the project again, as the only tender recieved exceeded the current budget allocation.
The revised tender included outcomes from a flood mitigation/drainage study carried out by the NT Government.

September 21, 2017

Tender Sytesm Vs Cops




Systemic delay in repairing roads.Systemic delay in repairing roads.


HYDERABAD: The long-drawn tender process followed by the Greater Hyderabad Municipal Corporation (GHMC) for relaying dug-up roads should either be done away with completely or streamlined to put the city's road infrastructure back on track, feel traffic cops.

Pointing out that currently it takes at least six months to complete just the tender process for restoration of dug up roads, which the city just cannot afford, traffic cops said there are several instances of road stretches being dug up repeatedly and not being re-surfaced, leaving behind un-motorable roads as the civic body's tender process takes its own sweet time.

As per the current system, when an agency seeks permission from GHMC for road digging, cost of required restoration work has to be submitted by the agency to the civic body before taking up the work. However, the tender process for restoring roads starts only after digging is completed.

"While it not possible to refuse permission for any development work, in most cases the contractor just dumps mud or loose gravel on the stretches. It is the gap between the completion of work and the actual filling of the road that results in traffic woes. We have suggested that the procedural fulfilling of tender be done away with and the road be filled immediately after the work is done," said AV Ranganath, deputy commissioner of police, traffic (Hyderabad II).


In fact, Malkajgiri, Anandbagh, Banjara Hills (Road No 5), Ayyappa Society , Secunderabad, LB Nagar, Bowenpally , Madhavpuri Hills, Chandanagar, PJR Enclave, KPHB and Sultan bazaar are examples of areas where such dug up road stretches have become a never-ending nightmare.


"The Maharani Jhansi Road from Putlibowli Chowrasta to Afzalganj has been in a poor condition for the past two ye ars. Only surgical repair work by pouring bitumen is done after the frequent digging work," complained resident Balasubramanyam Perugu.

TOP COMMENT

Yingo !! Faashtu Traaku antay Naakishtamochhinonkisthaa .. annattu .. Gadhay Dora & Son (P) Ltd ku gaavaalay .. Ovvallathono Jeppichhi, Nijamganay Sathrolaipoyindhi "processu" anjeppi S... Read MoreArey O Sambha


Chandramohan Singh, a resident of Marredpally , said, "The road from Reliance Fresh super market to the check post in West Marredpally was repaired about six months back but is back to its potholed self. Even the road near Lions Hospital, which was dug up for laying drainage pipes, has not been restored."


While GHMC authorities admitted the tender process takes at least two months, they said that in the case of Malkajgiri the delays stretched to nearly a year because the payment was completed only recently by Water Board, which has taken up pipeline laying work. "Once the work is completed, estimates are drawn up and sent for sanction. Then a tender is called for and a contractor is decided. The process requires at least two months.While dealing with other departments we can't press for payment beforehand," said M Shanker, deputy chief engineer, maintenance, GHMC.

Source- Times of India