Showing posts with label color bitumen. Show all posts
Showing posts with label color bitumen. Show all posts

September 28, 2017

Another Tender War


Work on white-topping of roads is set to begin and around 30 roads stretching 93.47 km will be white-topped in two phases. The tender process for the project, which has been divided into two packages, has been completed.

The first package has been handed over to NCC which involves six roads and six circles. The second package involves 24 roads and the contract has been handed over to Madhukan. The companies have been given 11 months to complete the project.

“Roads will be white-topped on the lines of Nrupathunga Road. Work will start by October,” said Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) commissioner N Manjunath Prasad.

He also said the stretch along Mysuru Road-Sumanahalli Junction-Goraguntepalya-BEL Circle-Hebbal-KR Puram will be taken up soon since the traffic here is heavy. “We are trying to reduce the inconvenience caused to motorists as much as possible and hence we have instructed the contractors to complete the project within six months,” said Prasad.

“We need to completely bar vehicular movement during the project. We will create alternative routes during this period in consultation with the traffic police,” said K T Nagaraj, BBMP chief engineer, (projects).

He also said work will 
be taken up according to the availability of the paver machines which are used for white-topping.

Around six circles are being white-topped in the project. The circle near Ramakrishna Ashram, Lalbagh West, North and East gates, near Siddapura Teacher’s College and Bhashyam Circle will be white-topped. A total of Rs 21.24 crore is being spent on this. “These works come under Package 1,” said Nagaraj.

White-topping, or concretisation, gives roads a life of up to 25 years and results in fuel savings of 14%. The Centre for Smart Cities (CSC) Research had recommended that white-topping helps in reducing traffic and increasing the lifespan of the road. The state government has allotted Rs 2,000-3,000 crore under the Nagarothana scheme for this project.

Source- Deccan Herald

September 27, 2017

Road Upgrade

Council to spend $1m on road upgrade


Last week, official manager Mark Blackburn voted to hire Palmerston-based contractor JLM Civil Works for the job.
“I think this is a straightforward contract,” he said.
A report by Melissa Moss, Environment and Strategic Support Officer, recommended awarding the tender — worth $1,058,389.64 — to the company.
Also vying for the contract was local company Ciarla Constructions, who tendered $1,413,054.80; and BMD Urban which has its head office in Queensland.
Ms Moss said each contract was weighted on local industry; past performance experience; resources and methodology knowledge and skills. “All Contractors assessed by the tender evaluation committee were identified as being capable of performing the works to the standard described in the tender documents,” she said.
“After evaluating all tenders against both the price and non-price criteria, the tender submitted by JLM Civil Works Pty Ltd, was considered to offer best value for money.”
Ms Moss said three tenders were submitted, though nine were downloaded.
Former chief executive Ricky Bruhn, who quit last week, said it was the second time the project had come before council.
“We got a better response this time round,” he said. 
“We’re hoping to start this project as soon as possible — before the rain starts.”
In July, Palmerston Council voted not to accept any tender for the Yarrawonga and Wallaby Holtze Road upgrade, as none were deemed suitable.
At the time, Mr Blackburn voted to tender the project again, as the only tender recieved exceeded the current budget allocation.
The revised tender included outcomes from a flood mitigation/drainage study carried out by the NT Government.

September 21, 2017

Tender Sytesm Vs Cops




Systemic delay in repairing roads.Systemic delay in repairing roads.


HYDERABAD: The long-drawn tender process followed by the Greater Hyderabad Municipal Corporation (GHMC) for relaying dug-up roads should either be done away with completely or streamlined to put the city's road infrastructure back on track, feel traffic cops.

Pointing out that currently it takes at least six months to complete just the tender process for restoration of dug up roads, which the city just cannot afford, traffic cops said there are several instances of road stretches being dug up repeatedly and not being re-surfaced, leaving behind un-motorable roads as the civic body's tender process takes its own sweet time.

As per the current system, when an agency seeks permission from GHMC for road digging, cost of required restoration work has to be submitted by the agency to the civic body before taking up the work. However, the tender process for restoring roads starts only after digging is completed.

"While it not possible to refuse permission for any development work, in most cases the contractor just dumps mud or loose gravel on the stretches. It is the gap between the completion of work and the actual filling of the road that results in traffic woes. We have suggested that the procedural fulfilling of tender be done away with and the road be filled immediately after the work is done," said AV Ranganath, deputy commissioner of police, traffic (Hyderabad II).


In fact, Malkajgiri, Anandbagh, Banjara Hills (Road No 5), Ayyappa Society , Secunderabad, LB Nagar, Bowenpally , Madhavpuri Hills, Chandanagar, PJR Enclave, KPHB and Sultan bazaar are examples of areas where such dug up road stretches have become a never-ending nightmare.


"The Maharani Jhansi Road from Putlibowli Chowrasta to Afzalganj has been in a poor condition for the past two ye ars. Only surgical repair work by pouring bitumen is done after the frequent digging work," complained resident Balasubramanyam Perugu.

TOP COMMENT

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Chandramohan Singh, a resident of Marredpally , said, "The road from Reliance Fresh super market to the check post in West Marredpally was repaired about six months back but is back to its potholed self. Even the road near Lions Hospital, which was dug up for laying drainage pipes, has not been restored."


While GHMC authorities admitted the tender process takes at least two months, they said that in the case of Malkajgiri the delays stretched to nearly a year because the payment was completed only recently by Water Board, which has taken up pipeline laying work. "Once the work is completed, estimates are drawn up and sent for sanction. Then a tender is called for and a contractor is decided. The process requires at least two months.While dealing with other departments we can't press for payment beforehand," said M Shanker, deputy chief engineer, maintenance, GHMC.

Source- Times of India

October 10, 2016

TOT or Advance Selling of Human Traffic Loads ?

The National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) is preparing to start the process of monetizing toll-based operational road assets under the toll, operate and transfer (TOT) model, aimed to bring new investments to the highways sector.

“We have not as yet floated tenders to monetize road assets, but are preparing to do so. We expect to begin doing this in 2-3 months’ time under the TOT model,” NHAI chairman Raghav Chandra said in an email response to queries from Mint.

This will be India’s first exercise in auctioning NHAI’s operational projects after a cabinet clearance in August. The proceeds will fund new highway projects under various models.

NHAI is currently working on the guidelines for TOT, under which the investor will collect tolls and be responsible for operation and maintenance of the project. The TOT model will be essential to attract long-term foreign investment, financial investors and investment bankers told Mint.

NHAI can lease up to 75 national highway projects which are fetching tolls for at least two years to various entities on the TOT model. The overall annual toll collected from these projects is about Rs2,700 crore, against which NHAI can expect to raise Rs25,000-30,000 crore by granting 30-year concessions, said Ashish Agarwal, director (infrastructure) at investment bank Equirus Capital.

The TOT model is long overdue, said Gautam Bhandari, partner at I Squared Capital, a US-based investor in road projects. “We are hopeful that NHAI finally does launch its TOT programme so that it can serve as a model for other sectors as well. As a global investor, we believe that NHAI’s TOT model, if executed properly, could be a win-win for everyone. Proceeds from TOT auctions will free up valuable taxpayer capital that can then be recycled for much-needed new infrastructure projects,” he said.

I Squared is looking to invest as much as $1 billion in Indian infrastructure. It has invested more than Rs1,000 crore through its investment platform Cube Highways and Infrastructure Pte. Ltd in three road projects so far.

IDFC Alternatives, which has bought controlling stakes in operational road projects, is waiting to see the fine print. “The good part is that in the TOT model, there are far less variables and concerns to be addressed as compared to projects with embedded construction risks. The differences in the bids here would be more a function of how differently each investor views the traffic growth rates, maintenance costs, synergies with other projects in one’s portfolio, if any,” said Aditya Aggarwal, partner (infrastructure), IDFC Alternatives.

There is significant interest from international infrastructure funds in the Indian road sector, said Rahul Mody, managing director, Ambit Corporate Finance Pvt. Ltd. “The TOT model is an excellent idea. The model takes away two key risks in the road sector—delays or cost overruns and initial traffic discovery—as the assets that will be offered under this (model) will be operational with some tolling history; hence it should attract considerable interest from Indian companies as well as foreign investors,” Mody said.

“The model can be an avenue for NHAI to raise upfront capital to fund the EPC and HAM projects; opportunity to feed the increasing number of pension funds and infrastructure investors having access to low cost capital and further deepen the infrastructure market; and allowing players to choose better the nature of risk-reward play they want to play in the road sector,” Agarwal said.

Source- LiveMint

September 29, 2016

Global Bitumen Market

The global bitumen market is forecast to grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of four percent between 2015 to 2020, and the world’s largest energy traders such as the Vitol Group and the Trafigura Group Pte. are in a race to increase their market share.

The bitumen market was valued at around $75 billion in 2014 and is expected to reach $94 billion in 2020, according to a report by Zion Research, titled, “Bitumen (Paving Bitumen, Oxidized Bitumen, Cutback Bitumen, Bitumen Emulsion, Polymer Modified Bitumen and Others) Market for Roadways, Waterproofing, Adhesives, Insulation and Other Applications - Global Industry Perspective, Comprehensive Analysis and Forecast, 2014 – 2020”.

Bitumen is a semi-solid form of petroleum, which is used to make asphalt for roads, waterproofing for roofs, insulation, and adhesives. It is either obtained by distillation of petroleum or is available naturally, such as in Canada’s oil sands.

Bitumen is used mainly in road manufacturing. A surge in road construction activity in Asia will propel growth for the product going forward. 75 percent of the global consumption of bitumen was used for road construction in 2014.

Waterproofing of roofing and building construction was the second major consumer of bitumen in 2014. Increased construction of homes to cater for the growing population is likely to add to the bitumen demand in the future.

Along with roofing, polymer modified bitumen (PMB), which is used as a chemical additive and adhesive, will witness rapid growth compared to other forms of bitumen.

Trucks, trains, and barges have been used traditionally to transport bitumen from refineries to local consumers; however, a drop in supply from the aging refineries in the U.S. and Europe has necessitated the use of oceangoing tankers, to supply the material from its source of production to the end consumer.

Vitol, the largest independent oil-trading house teamed up with U.S.-based Sargeant Marine Inc., which distributes asphalt to customers worldwide to form Valt, which operates the world’s largest dedicated asphalt fleet, handling parcel sizes from 20 metric tons up to 37,000 metric tons through its fleet of fourteen specialist vessels, according to its website.

“It used to be mostly a small distribution business,” Chris Bake, a senior executive at Rotterdam-based Vitol, said in an interview. “Now it is more of a whole arbitrage business requiring a global reach and shipping capacity,” reports Bloomberg.

Trafigura group is also not far behind. Its Singapore-based unit, Puma Energy has added four new bitumen vessels, taking the total number of vessels to 11, which cater to the Asian markets.

“We see a definite upward trend in the number of nautical miles for bitumen,” said Valt Chief Commercial Officer Nick Fay, who estimates an annual increase of about 7 percent. “All the new refineries that are getting built don’t make bitumen,” reports Bloomberg.

The Guvnor Group is planning to invest in the Perth Amboy asphalt refinery and storage facility in New Jersey, which has been shut since 2008, reports Bloomberg.

There is hardly any public information about the bitumen market, which makes it ideal for the large energy traders, who use their energy expertise and global connection to supply to far-off markets.

“There is a perception that the world is going to be more disconnected -- supply and demand-wise -- and we are there to help connect the dots,” Klintholm said.

Nonetheless, increased use of asphalt for roads and environmental concerns with bitumen manufacturing could pose a risk for the growth of the bitumen industry in the future.

By Rakesh Upadhyay for Oilprice.com

July 20, 2016

The South African National Roads Agency (Sanral) his issued tenders to six pre-qualified bidders for each of the mega-bridges, over the Mtentu and Msikaba River gorges, that are to be part of the greenfield section of the N2 Wild Coast Road project.

This is in spite of the fact that the project, which has been dogged by controversy since its inception 15 years ago, still faces some unresolved legal issues. There was huge opposition from KwaZulu-Natal road users who expected to fund the project through increased tolling in their province. However, this opposition has fallen away as the KwaZulu-Natal section has been excluded from the project. The revised N2 Wild Coast Road Project runs from East London to the Mtamvuna River Bridge, a distance of approximately 410km.

Bizana residents fear being displaced and the Amadiba Crisis Committee has objected to the project, claiming it is linked to the Xolobeni dune mining proposal, against which they are fighting. Conservation organisations are bitterly opposed to the fact that the greenfields section of the proposed route will pass through the environmentally sensitive Pondoland Centre of Endemism, part of a global floral hot spot.

Sanral spokesman Mbulelo Peterson said that an open pre-qualification process had been followed before the issuing of the tenders. He said that, due to the size and complexity of the two bridges, which are expected to cost around R3,5-billion to construct, the tender periods were 18 weeks and 20 weeks respectively for the Mtentu and Msikaba Bridges. Tenders would close at the end of October for the Mtentu Bridge and early in November for the Msikaba Bridge. Construction of the bridges was likely to start early next year.

THE N2 Wild Coast road project was already well under way as Sanral had started working on it as soon as it had received the go-ahead from the Minister of Environmental Affairs in 2010. Mr Peterson said that, to date, Sanral had done extensive work on upgrading existing roads on the N2 between East London and Mthatha and on the future new N2 alignment along the current R61 route between Mthatha and Port St Johns.

All work already done on the N2 Wild Coast Road had been funded from non-toll funding and only the greenfields section of the route would be funded through a mix of government grant and tollings.

“Sanral, the Department of Transport and National Treasury are in discussion to finalise the funding model for the greenfields section. By law only roads funded through toll funding can be tolled and no cross-subsidisation of tolling is allowed,” he said.

This meant Sanral could not erect new toll booths or adjust tariffs at existing toll plazas within KwaZulu-Natal to fund roads in the Eastern Cape.

“New toll roads must be gazetted and go through an extensive public participation process after gazetting.”

In January this year, government gave the green light for the construction of the greenfields section of the project, between Ndwalane outside Port St Johns and the Mtamvuna River.

Mr Peterson said this part of the project would start with the construction of the massive bridges over the Mtentu and Msikaba Rivers, which border the Mkambati Nature Reserve. Once these were under way, construction of the remaining approximately 110km of road, the seven additional river bridges and four interchanges would start.

Source - Southcoast Herald

February 18, 2016

Water Over and Under Bitumen

Repairs continue on Northern Territory's Buntine Highway after massive flood washes away sections of road

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Updated 18 minutes ago
The clean-up is continuing after recent severe flooding across the Top End's Victoria River District caused sections of the Buntine Highway to be washed away.
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  00:00             00:00       
AUDIO: Gordon Atkinson from the NT Department of Infrastructure says five-metre sections of Buntine Highway bitumen were lifted and carried away by rushing water(ABC Rural)
The NT Department of Infrastructure has confirmed that whole five-metre sections of bitumen had lifted and been carried away by rushing water.
The department's Gordon Atkinson said the rain events had been bigger than anything seen over the past 10 years.
He said it was normal for road surfaces to be ripped up by such intense events.
"The bitumen has water running over the top of it and the water gets underneath and helps to lift it as well, a bit like an aeroplane wing," he said.
Mr Atkinson said the priority was to repair damage and make the highway operational, and that a longer road improvement would continue in the background.
"All our major repairs are finished, so the Buntine Highway is open to major traffic and there are no weight restrictions," Mr Atkinson said.
He said the last bits of resealing required would happen soon and drivers were safely doing 100 kilometres per hour over those sections.
Mr Atkinson said the "mountains of organic debris" left on bridges had been largely cleaned up, with a large quantity of snakes and spiders keeping workers on their toes.
"Nobody got bitten," Mr Atkinson said. "They are used to it now. They've got gloves on, they are using pitchforks, poles and chainsaws on long chain bars.
"They are ready to start running when the snakes appear."